Article

Predictors of Organizational Commitment Among Staff in Assisted Living

Department of Sociology and Anthropology, P.O. Box 25000, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-1360, USA.
The Gerontologist (Impact Factor: 3.21). 05/2005; 45(2):196-205. DOI: 10.1093/geront/45.2.196
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study examines the role of organizational culture, job satisfaction, and sociodemographic characteristics as predictors of organizational commitment among staff in assisted living. It is particularly important to examine organizational commitment, because of its close links to staff turnover.
Data were collected from 317 staff members in 61 facilities, using self-administered questionnaires. The facilities were selected from licensed assisted living programs and were stratified into small, traditional, and new-model homes. Staff questionnaires were distributed by a researcher during 1-day visits to each facility. Organizational commitment was measured by the extent of staff identification, involvement, and loyalty to the organization.
Organizational culture, job satisfaction, and education were strong predictors of commitment, together explaining 58% of the total variance in the dependent variable. Higher levels of organizational commitment were associated with more favorable staff perceptions of organizational culture and greater job satisfaction. In addition, more educated staff members tended to report higher levels of organizational commitment. Other than education, sociodemographic characteristics failed to account for a significant amount of variance in organizational commitment.
Because job satisfaction and organizational culture were strong predictors of commitment, interventions aimed at increasing job satisfaction and creating an organizational culture that values and respects staff members could be most effective in producing higher levels of organizational commitment.

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    • "Commitment has been defined as attachment, identification, or loyalty to the entity of the commitment (Morrow, 1983, 1993) and organizational commitment as " the relative strength of an individual's identification with and involvement in a particular organization " (Mowday et al., 1982, p. 27). Organizational commitment continues as one of the extensively deliberated phenomena in the organizational behavior literature because of its relationships with absenteeism, turnover, and job performance of the employees (Bentein et al., 2005; Bolander and Jones, 2009; Cooper-Hakim and Viswesvaran, 2005; Grant et al., 2008; Maertz et al., 2007; Sikorska-Simmons, 2005). It also has been reported to be significantly associated with diverse employee behavior like punctuality at work, citizenship behavior, job satisfaction, etc. (Bogler, 2005; Dishon-Berkovits and Koslowsky, 2002) and fostering employees' organizational commitment is considered to be the prime concern for present-day organizations to retain talented employees in a knowledge-driven economy (Neininger et al., 2010; Reiche, 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to examine the relationship among job involvement, organizational commitment, team commitment and professional commitment and to explore generational differences for these variables. Design/methodology/approach – It used structured questionnaire survey approach for which data were collected from 477 full-time employees of 13 organizations from diverse sectors in India. Respondents were categorized into four generational cohorts following the classification reported in Robbins et al. (2011). Findings – The findings of the study indicated that professional commitment is negatively related with job involvement, affective organizational commitment, normative organizational commitment, and team commitment. Job involvement, affective and normative organizational commitment, and team commitment were positively correlated. Differences were observed among Generation Y, Generation X, Liberals, and Socialist for job involvement, affective organizational commitment, normative organizational commitment, professional commitment, and team commitment. Generation Y, for example, was found high in professional commitment, while Socialist were found higher on affective organizational commitment compared to other generations. Practical implications – Findings suggests that there is a decrease in job involvement, affective organizational commitment, normative organizational commitment, and increase in professional commitment in young generations. Organizations need to take consideration this while designing the HR policies for employees’ engagement. Originality/value – The contribution of the study lies in examining the employees’ attitude to different dimensions of work life and differences among Indian generations.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2015 · Benchmarking An International Journal
    • "Commitment has been defined as attachment, identification, or loyalty to the entity of the commitment (Morrow, 1983, 1993) and organizational commitment as " the relative strength of an individual's identification with and involvement in a particular organization " (Mowday et al., 1982, p. 27). Organizational commitment continues as one of the extensively deliberated phenomena in the organizational behavior literature because of its relationships with absenteeism, turnover, and job performance of the employees (Bentein et al., 2005; Bolander and Jones, 2009; Cooper-Hakim and Viswesvaran, 2005; Grant et al., 2008; Maertz et al., 2007; Sikorska-Simmons, 2005). It also has been reported to be significantly associated with diverse employee behavior like punctuality at work, citizenship behavior, job satisfaction, etc. (Bogler, 2005; Dishon-Berkovits and Koslowsky, 2002) and fostering employees' organizational commitment is considered to be the prime concern for present-day organizations to retain talented employees in a knowledge-driven economy (Neininger et al., 2010; Reiche, 2008). "

    No preview · Article · Jan 2015 · Benchmarking An International Journal
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    • "In RC/AL settings, personal care (PC) staff typically take care of residents' daily needs, including personal hygiene, housekeeping, meals, and assisting with medication administration (Chou & Robert , 2008). The retention of PC staff is one of the biggest challenges to quality of care in long-term care, in that turnover disrupts continuity of resident care, creates burden for other staff, and incurs costs in hiring and training new staff (Sikorska-Simmons, 2005). Given these consequences, a number of studies—conducted primarily in nursing homes—have examined factors that contribute to staff retention and staff turnover (Angelelli, Gifford, Shah, & Mor, 2001; Castle, 2001, 2005; Castle & Engberg, 2005; Castle & Lin, 2010; Fitzpatrick, 2002). "
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    ABSTRACT: Research within residential care/assisted living (RC/AL) settings has shown that the attitudes of personal care (PC) staff toward their organization and its residents and families can affect the quality of resident care. This article describes the perceptions, experiences, and attitudes of PC staff and their supervisors, and considers these data in the context of non-hierarchical staffing patterns-a philosophically expected, yet unproven tenet of RC/AL. Using data collected from 18 RC/AL communities, these analyses compared the characteristics, perceptions, experiences, and attitudes of PC staff (N = 250) and supervisors (N = 30). Compared to supervisors, PC staff reported greater burden, frustration, depersonalization, hassles, and feeling significantly more controlling of, and less in partnership with, families (p < 0.05). Because the PC staff experience is crucial for resident outcomes, more work is needed to create an environment where PC staff are less burdened and have better attitudes toward work and families. [Journal of Gerontological Nursing, xx(x), xx-xx.].
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2013 · Journal of Gerontological Nursing
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