Article

Tissue-mimicking phantom materials for narrowband and ultrawideband microwave applications

Department of Medical Physics, University of Wisconsin–Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
Physics in Medicine and Biology (Impact Factor: 2.76). 10/2005; 50(18):4245-58. DOI: 10.1088/0031-9155/50/18/001
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

We propose and characterize oil-in-gelatin dispersions that approximate the dispersive dielectric properties of a variety of human soft tissues over the microwave frequency range from 500 MHz to 20 GHz. Different tissues are mimicked by selection of an appropriate concentration of oil. The materials possess long-term stability and can be employed in heterogeneous configurations without change in geometry or dielectric properties due to osmotic effects. Thus, these materials can be used to construct heterogeneous phantoms, including anthropomorphic types, for narrowband and ultrawideband microwave technologies, such as breast cancer detection and imaging systems.

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    • "The most common applications include the development and validation of medical imaging modalities, such as ultrasound [1] [2], computed tomography (CT) [3], magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) [4] [5] [6] [7], and others [8]. Simulation of electromagnetic properties of tissues [9], mimicking mechanical properties [10], and focused ultrasound ablation [11]are additional ways that tissue-mimicking phantoms are used. Most of these applications are for generalized studies and are not patient-specific. "
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