Article

Antineural antibody in patients with Tourette's syndrome and their family members

Department of Pediatrics, Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, United States
Journal of Biomedical Science (Impact Factor: 2.76). 02/2006; 13(1):101-12. DOI: 10.1007/s11373-005-9033-y
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

It has been proposed that antineural antibodies were present in patients with Tourette's syndrome (TS) and other neuropsychiatric disorders. The purpose of our study was to investigate the presence of antineural antibodies in the individuals with Tourette's syndrome and the family members of TS patients. The sera of four TS patients with no current streptococcal infection, their tic-free family members including father, mother and sibling, and a age-matched control group who were tic free were assayed for antineural antibodies directed against rat tissue and neurons in primary cell culture. There were prominent antineural antibodies present in TS patients and their first-degree family members, but not in the control group. Western blotting showed proteins of about 120 kDa in their sera that were not present in the sera of controls. The preliminary results of our study suggest the importance of genetic vulnerability in the immunological pathophysiology of tic disorders. Future studies should investigate the interactions of genetics, environment, infectious agents, and immunity on symptom expression in families with tic disorders.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: James F Leckman, Jan 25, 2016
  • Source
    • "Maternal antibodies are transferred to the fetus by the placenta, with a rapid increase by gestational week 26–34 and continuous exposure during breast-feeding. Although maternal antibodies play an important role in providing passive immunity, the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies targeting the CNS in the developing fetus and neonate can be deleterious as the presence of brain-specific autoantibodies has been associated with offspring cognitive impairment (Lee et al., 2009), obsessions and/or compulsions, Tourette's syndrome (Yeh et al., 2006; Maina et al., 2009; Martino et al., 2009) and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Braunschweig et al., 2012; Gesundheit et al., 2013) (for review see Billington (1992), Fox et al. (2012)). MIA has also been shown to impact brain development and could be a result of viral, bacterial or parasitic infections in both animal and human populations. "

    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014
  • Source
    • "Maternal antibodies are transferred to the fetus by the placenta, with a rapid increase by gestational week 26–34 and continuous exposure during breast-feeding. Although maternal antibodies play an important role in providing passive immunity, the presence of pathogenic autoantibodies targeting the CNS in the developing fetus and neonate can be deleterious as the presence of brain-specific autoantibodies has been associated with offspring cognitive impairment (Lee et al., 2009), obsessions and/or compulsions, Tourette's syndrome (Yeh et al., 2006; Maina et al., 2009; Martino et al., 2009) and neurodevelopmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD) (Braunschweig et al., 2012; Gesundheit et al., 2013) (for review see Billington (1992), Fox et al. (2012)). MIA has also been shown to impact brain development and could be a result of viral, bacterial or parasitic infections in both animal and human populations. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Communication between maternal-fetal immune systems: development of immune tolerance.•Pathways by which immune dysfunction could contribute to neurodevelopmental disorders.•Effects of prenatal/perinatal stress and immune activity on CNS development/function.•Effects of prenatal/perinatal malnutrition on immune and CNS development/function.•Health benefits of physical activity during pregnancy for mother, fetus and infant.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2014 · Brain Research
  • Source
    • "The potential autoimmune contribution to Tourette Syndrome (TS) has recently gained research attention. For instance, although the sample size was modest, Yeh et al. found antineural antibodies in the sera of four patients with TS as well as in their family members (Yeh, et al., 2006); in contrast, antineural antibodies were not found in normal healthy controls. This presumed link between autoimmune processes and certain mental disorders has also sparked the study of neuroimmunological processes as they potentially relate to the pathophysiology of obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: A commonality across a number of pediatric neuropsychiatric disorders is a higher than typical rate of familial - and especially maternal - autoimmune disease. Of recent interest, a subtype of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and tic disorders known collectively as Pediatric Autoimmune Neuropsychiatric Disorders Associated with Streptococcus (PANDAS) is believed to be secondary to central nervous system (CNS) autoimmunity that occurs in relation to group A streptococcal infection. Thus, we hypothesized that a sample of children with OCD and/or tics would have an increased maternal risk for an autoimmune response relative to population norms. We also expected maternal prevalence of various autoimmune diseases to be higher among those participants that met the putative criteria for PANDAS. We examined, via structured interview, the medical history of the biological mothers of 107 children with OCD and/or tics. Autoimmune disorders were reported in 17.8% of study mothers, which is significantly greater than the general prevalence among women in the United States (approximately 5%). Further, study mothers were more likely to report having an autoimmune disease if their children were considered "likely PANDAS" cases versus "unlikely PANDAS" cases. The results offer preliminary support for hypothesized links between maternal autoimmune disease and both OCD/tics and PANDAS in youth. Further research is necessary to clarify these general associations; links to specific autoimmune disease; and relevance of autoimmune disease in other family members (e.g., fathers).
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2010 · Journal of neuroimmunology
Show more