Article

It's the way you ask that matters: Comparison of data relating to prevalence of incontinence aid use from two surveys of people with multiple sclerosis

Department of General Practice, National University of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
Journal of WOCN (Impact Factor: 1.18). 01/2006; 33(1):26-9.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The method used for data collection and research affects the outcomes and must be carefully considered when planning studies and when evaluating study results. This article presents the profound differences in outcomes generated by anonymous questionnaire vs face-to-face interviews. In this limited study regarding the use of incontinence aids among individuals with multiple sclerosis, the prevalence rates generated by questionnaire were 3 times the rates generated by interviews. Possible reasons for this discrepancy are addressed, and implications for research and for practice are identified.

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    • "The taboo and embarrassment that affects help-seeking by people affected by incontinence may also affect the quality of self-reporting in research (Buckley, 2006). Therefore the language and layout of each item of study documentation intended for use by the men participating in the research was discussed at length by researchers, clinicians and a patient organisation representative with an academic interest in research. "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper explains the rationale behind the intervention used for a large multi-centred randomised controlled trial for men following transurethral resection of prostate or radical prostatectomy. It shows the content of the protocol used and explains why this particular protocol of pelvic floor muscle exercises and urge suppression techniques was chosen for men in the intervention group. The trial will evaluate whether this intervention will be effective for men with urinary incontinence and sexual dysfunction after prostate surgery. ISRCTN number: ISRCTN87696430.
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2009 · Physiotherapy
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    • "The taboo and embarrassment that affects help-seeking by people affected by incontinence may also affect the quality of self-reporting in research (Buckley, 2006). Therefore the language and layout of each item of study documentation intended for use by the men participating in the research was discussed at length by researchers, clinicians and a patient organisation representative with an academic interest in research. "

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    ABSTRACT: Fecal incontinence is an important health issue that has devastating psychological, social and economic consequences for the aging population. However, it is under-reported and under-treated, often because of mistaken assumptions that incontinence is a normal part of aging and that little can be done about it. There are effective treatments that can be easily implemented in the primary-care setting, which can greatly improve an older person's quality of life and potentially avert premature referral to a nursing home. Therefore, it is important that clinicians screen for the problem and are comfortable with its evaluation and treatment. This article reviews the epidemiology of fecal incontinence, approaches to improving identification and quality of care, as well as the assessment and treatment of the most common etiologies of fecal incontinence.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2007 · Aging Health
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