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Penn K, Wu D, Eisen JA, Ward N.. Characterization of bacterial communities associated with deep-sea corals on Gulf of Alaska seamounts. Appl Environ Microbiol 72: 1680-1683

Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
Applied and Environmental Microbiology (Impact Factor: 3.67). 03/2006; 72(2):1680-3. DOI: 10.1128/AEM.72.2.1680-1683.2006
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although microbes associated with shallow-water corals have been reported, deepwater coral microbes are poorly characterized. A cultivation-independent analysis of Alaskan seamount oclocoral microflora showed that Proteobacteria (classes Alphaproteobacteria and Gammaproteobacteria), Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, and Acidobacteria dominate and vary in abundance. More sampling is needed to understand the basis and significance of this variation. Copyright © 2006, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

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