Effect of oral acamprosate on abstinence in patients with alcohol dependence in a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial: The role of patient motivation

ArticleinJournal of Psychiatric Research 40(5):383-93 · September 2006with14 Reads
Impact Factor: 3.96 · DOI: 10.1016/j.jpsychires.2006.02.002 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    This is the first US study to evaluate the clinical efficacy of acamprosate (Campral), a newly FDA-approved medication for maintaining abstinence in patients with alcohol dependence following alcohol withdrawal. We compared effects of the standard 2 g dose (n=258) and an exploratory 3 g dose of acamprosate (n=83) versus placebo (n=260), and evaluated drug safety in a double-blind, placebo-controlled 6-month trial conducted in 21 outpatient clinics across the US. Participants were 601 volunteers with current alcohol dependence recruited primarily by advertisement. All patients concomitantly received eight sessions of brief manual-guided counseling (www.alcoholfree.info). The main outcome measure was the percentage of alcohol-free days over the 6-month study. Self-report was validated by breath alcohol concentration, gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) and collateral informant interviews. The percentage of abstinent days did not differ significantly across groups in a priori analysis (54.3% for placebo, 56.1% for 2 g, 60.7% for 3 g). Post-hoc analysis controlling for baseline variables and treatment exposure found acamprosate was associated with a significantly higher percentage of abstinent days than placebo (52.3% for placebo, 58.2% for 2 g, 62.7% for 3 g; P=0.01), with an even greater effect in the subgroup of 241 patients having a baseline goal of abstinence (58.1% for placebo, 70.0% for 2 g, 72.5% for 3 g; P=0.02). There were no deaths or serious drug-related adverse events. The US study findings suggest that acamprosate is safe and well tolerated in a broadly inclusive sample of alcoholics and appears effective in populations of patients motivated to have a treatment goal of abstinence.