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Sports injuries: Population based representative data on incidence, diagnosis, sequelae, and high risk groups

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Abstract

To generate national representative data on the incidence, diagnosis, severity, and nature of medically treated sports injuries and to identify high risk groups. The first national health survey for the Federal Republic of Germany, conducted in the format of a standardised, written, cross sectional survey in the period October 1997 to March 1999, gathered data on the incidence of accident and injury and information on social demographics, injury related disability/time off work, and injury location/setting. The net sample comprised 7124 people aged 18-79. 3.1% of adult Germans said they sustained a sports injury during the previous year, corresponding to an annual injury rate of 5.6% among those engaging in regular recreational physical activity and ranking sports injuries as the second most common type of accident. About 62% of all sports injuries result in time taken off work. The period of occupational disability is 14 days or less in around two thirds of these cases. The occupational disability rate after occupational and traffic accidents is much higher by comparison. Dislocations, distortions, and/or torn ligaments make up 60% of all sports injuries, followed by fractures (18%), contusions, surface wounds, or open wounds (12%). Three out of four sports injury casualties are male. The incidence declines noticeably in higher age groups. Future injury prevention measures should focus on the high risk group of young male recreational athletes. The data indicate that the fear of damage to health and injury, believed to be significant internal psychological barriers to participation in sports, is largely unwarranted for the female population and/or older age groups. Sporting injuries are a marginal phenomenon among the female population and mobile seniors actively engaged in sports.
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Sports injuries: population based representative data on
incidence, diagnosis, sequelae, and high risk groups
S Schneider, B Seither, S To¨nges, H Schmitt
...............................................................................................................................
See end of article for
authors’ affiliations
.......................
Correspondence to:
Dr Schneider, Department
of Orthopaedic Surgery,
University of Heidelberg,
Heidelberg, Germany;
s.schneider@dkfz.de
Accepted1December2005
.......................
Br J Sports Med 2006;40:334–339. doi: 10.1136/bjsm.2005.022889
Objective: To generate national representative data on the incidence, diagnosis, severity, and nature of
medically treated sports injuries and to identify high risk groups.
Methods: The first national health survey for the Federal Republic of Germany, conducted in the format of
a standardised, written, cross sectional survey in the period October 1997 to March 1999, gathered data
on the incidence of accident and injury and information on social demographics, injury related disability/
time off work, and injury location/setting. The net sample comprised 7124 people aged 18–79.
Results: 3.1% of adult Germans said they sustained a sports injury during the previous year,
corresponding to an annual injury rate of 5.6% among those engaging in regular recreational physical
activity and ranking sports injuries as the second most common type of accident. About 62% of all sports
injuries result in time taken off work. The period of occupational disability is 14 days or less in around two
thirds of these cases. The occupational disability rate after occupational and traffic accidents is much
higher by comparison. Dislocations, distortions, and/or torn ligaments make up 60% of all sports injuries,
followed by fractures (18%), contusions, surface wounds, or open wounds (12%). Three out of four sports
injury casualties are male. The incidence declines noticeably in higher age groups.
Conclusions: Future injury prevention measures should focus on the high risk group of young male
recreational athletes. The data indicate that the fear of damage to health and injury, believed to be
significant internal psychological barriers to participation in sports, is largely unwarranted for the female
population and/or older age groups. Sporting injuries are a marginal phenomenon among the female
population and mobile seniors actively engaged in sports.
T
he positive effects of regular recreational physical activity
are uncontested: it can help to prevent numerous
diseases
1
and to lower health related risk factors such
as obesity and hypertension.
23
Most clinical trials and
epidemiology studies show a dose-response relation between
recreational physical activity and indicators of morbidity and
mortality.
4
The positive psychological and social impact of
physical activity is an added benefit.
5
By the same token,
health economy based cost benefit studies from the United
States, Austria, and Switzerland show that inactive people
generate 30–50% higher direct cost of illness than physically
active people.
6–8
Sports injuries are a side effect of sporting activity. The
extent to which they undermine the preventive potential of
regular physical activity is largely unknown in Germany
because of a hitherto deficient epidemiological database. For
one thing, German Census Bureau data and Government
issued healthcare bulletins are too unspecific, containing, for
instance, no information on injury type, localisation, and
severity.
9–13
For another, the few alternative papers on this
topic are based on selective insurance company
14
or hospital
15
data or subsume sports accidents along with other domestic
and recreational accidents.
13
The purpose of this study is therefore to generate
representative national sports injury incidence rates for
Germany. In addition to injury severity, type, and localisa-
tion, injury statistics for the total adult population are
projected. Incidence rates for separate sectors of the popula-
tion are also generated in order to identify high risk groups.
The importance of such information lies in the fact that
sports injuries are mostly avoidable and theoretically
controllable through the implementation of preventive
measures. In the light of the ongoing heated debate on
removal of certain sports injuries from the list of entities
covered by statutory health insurance benefits, our data may
help to objectify and provide a rational basis for healthcare
policy.
16
STUDY DESIGN AND METHODS
Database
The first national health survey for the Federal Republic of
Germany is a representative epidemiological study of the
German speaking inhabitants of the country. This cross
sectional study was the first since reunification to generate
healthcare data and information on the incidence, nature,
localisation, and consequences of injuries and accidents for
the total post-reunification German population. The survey
was conducted by the Robert Koch Institute on behalf of the
Federal Ministry of Health in the period October 1997 to
March 1999 and comprises a total net sample of 7124 people
aged 18–79.
17–19
Not all survey respondents answered the
sports injury questions. Hence, the subsequent bivariate
analyses are based on a weighted total sample size of 6911
after exclusion of 213 incomplete datasets. The factor
weighting according to age, sex, community size, and federal
state used in the survey enables representative conclusions to
be drawn for the adult population in post-reunification
Germany.
18
The national health survey data were provided to
our research group as a public use file as part of a cooperation
agreement with Robert Koch Institute, Berlin. The necessary
recoding and statistical/epidemiological analyses were per-
formed (on the basis of the raw data files) by the first and
second author. The national health survey also permits the
investigation of numerous other epidemiological and medical
issues, as documented on the Robert Koch Institute website
(www.rki.de) under the menu item ‘‘Forschung .
Publikationen’’ (‘‘Research . Publications’’).
334
www.bjsportmed.com
Procedures
During their time spent in the mobile investigational site,
study subjects were asked about the incidence of past injuries
using a standardised written questionnaire on the basis of the
question: ‘‘During the past 12 months, did you experience
any injury or poisoning requiring medical treatment?’’ The
response categories were: ‘‘No’’, ‘‘Yes, to be more precise:
During sports/games’’, ‘‘Yes, to be more precise: At home’’,
‘‘Yes, to be more precise: On the street’’, ‘‘Yes, to be more
precise: On the footpath’’, and ‘‘Yes, to be more precise: At
work/on the way to/from work’’; or ‘‘Yes, in another setting’’.
Information was also elicited on time off work/occupational
disability resulting from injury, and the duration of same
(including non-working days). Finally, the national health
survey also contains information on the diagnosis and site of
injury. To identify high risk groups, the extent of regular
recreational physical activity and demographic variables (sex
and age) are factored into our analyses. The sex of the subject
was dummy coded with 0 = male and 1 = female. The age
is expressed in whole years at the time of the interview and
was divided into 10 year age groups. Time spent exercising
was graded into five categories ‘‘no sporting activity’’, ‘‘less
than 1 hour per week’’, ‘‘regularly, 1–2 hours per week’’,
‘‘regularly, 2–4 hours per week’’ and ‘‘regularly, more than
4 hours per week’’ on the basis of responses to the question:
‘‘How often do you practise a sport?’’ A note explained that
the question related to average behaviour during the three
months before the survey.
In addition, all study subjects underwent a medical check
up involving measurement of blood pressure, a blood test,
urinalysis, and a simple physical examination to determine
basic anthropometric dimensions (height, waist to hip ratio,
etc). This check up was not performed by a doctor but by
trained study personnel. It did not involve differential
diagnostic procedures. Therefore the above information was
not included in our analyses.
Statistical design
Statistical analysis was started by determining the one year
incidence of sports injuries and the types of injury sustained.
Statistically speaking, this method calculated the risk of
injury, also known by the term ‘‘cumulative incidence rate’’.
20
The study subject, not the event causing the injury, was
defined as the unit of investigation in order to rule out
misinterpretations arising from the inclusion of multiply
injured individuals. Part two of the statistical analysis
investigated the severity of injury and cumulative incidence
rates for defined sectors of the population.
For metric variables, the arithmetic mean (SD) was
calculated. Group differences with regard to the investigated
factors were analysed by x
2
test. Age specific and sex specific
injury risk was identified by logistic regression analysis, with
the individual sporting activity held constant. All tests were
two tailed at a level of significance of p(0.05. All analyses
were performed using the statistics program SAS for
Windows, version 9.1.3 (SAS Institute Inc, Cary, North
Carolina, USA). The study was performed in accordance with
the ethical standards laid down in the 1964 Declaration of
Helsinki, and necessary approval was secured.
RESULTS
Injury incidence and influencing factors
A sporting injury was sustained by 3.1% of adult Germans
during the preceding year. Sports injuries thus represent the
second most common type of accident after domestic
accidents (3.7%) together with occupational accidents
(3.1%). Traffic accidents and pedestrian accidents are much
rarer, with respective incidence rates of 1.8% and 0.8%. For
the physically active population alone, the annual injury rate
is 5.6%.
About 62% of all sports injuries result in occupational
disability/time off work. The time taken off work is no more
than one week in one third and no more than two weeks in
another third of the cases. Occupational disability for longer
than 90 days arises in only 3% of these cases.
Sports injuries are less likely than other accidents to result
in occupational disability: 82% of occupational accidents, 71%
of pedestrian accidents, and 67% of road traffic accidents
result in time off work. In contrast, domestic accidents seem
to be less serious: 56% of those in household accidents or
incidents in the domestic environment said that they were
unable to go to work (or perform their usual housework).
Figure 1 shows relative incidences broken down by
accident type and site: six out of 10 sports injuries are
dislocations, distortions, and/or torn ligaments. The ques-
tionnaire used lay terms appropriate to the target populations
as a means of eliciting information on the type of injury—for
example, ‘‘sprain, strain, torn ligament’’. The second most
common type of injury (18%) was fracture (‘‘broken bone’’).
The most common fracture sites involved the lower extre-
mities (fig 1). Articular and ligamentous injuries were the
most common kinds of trauma and seem to be typical of
sports injuries; fig 2 shows that injuries of this kind are less
Minor head injury: 3%
Fracture of the
upper extremity: 4%
Intra-abdominal-
thoracic injury: 4%
Hip fracture: 1%
Distortion, dislocation,
rupture of ligaments: 60%
Fracture of the
lower extremity: 8%
Contusion, open or
superficial wound: 12%
Other fractures: 5% Other sports injuries: 3%
Figure 1 Relative distribution of sports injuries by type and location
(both sexes). German national health survey.
100
80
60
40
20
0
Percentage
31
26
20
25
18
20
25
32
35
12
14
11
1414
10
34
39
34
26
60
Distortion, dislocation, torn ligament
Fracture
Open wound, surface wound, contusion
Other injuries
Pedestrian accident
Sports injury
Domestic accident
Occupational accident
Road traffic accident
Figure 2 Diagnostic breakdown by accident setting/location. German
national health survey.
Sports injuries 335
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common in subjects involved in accidents occurring in other
settings. Contusions, open wounds, and surface wounds are
much more common in domestic and occupational accidents
(fig 2). More extensive analysis of the findings collated under
the residual category ‘‘Other injuries’’ shows that head
injuries—for example, concussions—are significantly more
common in other accident settings, especially pedestrian
accidents, than in association with sporting activity.
To identify high risk groups, let us take a look at
demographic distribution in terms of injury incidence.
Three quarters of recreational sports casualties in Germany
are male (table 1; p,0.001). The one year incidence declines
significantly in association with increasing age. Whereas one
in 14 (6.9%) of the 18–29 population sustains a sports injury
during the space of a year, the risk among the over 60
population is less than 1% (0.4%; table 1). However, an
exclusively bivariate analysis does not take into account the
fact that the risk of injury correlates closely with the extent of
individual sporting activity (‘‘time spent exercising’’). Finally,
as our data indicate, the incidence rates rise approximately in
proportion to the extent of recreational physical activity
(table 1). Factoring in sex and age specific sporting activity
produces the same picture. After adjustment within logistic
regression analysis for participation and time spent exercis-
ing, as called for by Uitenbroek, Jones et al and Taimela et al
21–
24
for injury studies of this kind, the risk pattern (presented as
odds ratios in table 1) remains largely unchanged: young
men represent by far the most significant risk group for
sports injuries. It is also evident on the basis of the odds
ratios of 4.38 to 17.97 that the risk of sports injury increases
with the extent of sporting activity (‘‘time spent exercising’’).
This can also be seen from fig 3, which summarises one year
incidences for 16 subpopulations.
In conclusion, our data form a reliable basis for
estimates on the incidence of injury in the German
population aged 18–79 (table 2), yielding an annual
incidence of 88 000 injuries in the over 60 population
(including 27 000 in the over 70s). The total annual incidence
of sports injuries estimated on the basis of national health
survey data is about 2 million.
DISCUSSION
Particularities of the methodology and limitations of
the database
The primary end point of this study is medically treated
sports injuries sustained during the 12 months preceding
Table 1 Incidence and risk of sports injuries as a function of sex, age, and time spent exercising (German national health
survey)
Correlate
Sector of
population
Cumulative incidence
Odds ratio with no
adjustment for other
variables
p Value and
sample size for
individual
regressions
Odds ratio adjusted
for sex, age and time
spent exercising
p Value and sample
size for total
regression
One year
incidence
p Value and
sample size
Sex Female 1.5% p,0.001 0.29 (0.21 to 0.40) p,0.001 0.37 (0.27 to 0.51) p,0.001
Male 4.8% 1.00
n = 6.954 n = 6.911
Age (in years) 70 to 79 0.4% p,0.001 0.06 (0.02 to 0.19) p,0.001 0.15 (0.04 to 0.48) p = 0.002
60 to 69 0.6% 0.08 (0.03 to 0.18) p,0.001 0.13 (0.06 to 0.30) p,0.001
50 to 59 2.7% 0.37 (0.25 to 0.56) p,0.001 0.58 (0.38 to 0.90) p = 0.014
40 to 49 2.9% 0.41 (0.28 to 0.61) p,0.001 0.57 (0.38 to 0.86) p = 0.007
30 to 39 3.4% 0.45 (0.32 to 0.65) p,0.001 0.58 (0.40 to 0.84) p = 0.004
Under 30 6.9% 1.00 1.00
n = 6.954 n = 6.911
Time spent
exercising
4 h/week
2–4 h/week
13.1%
7.6%
p,0.001 28.14 (16.44 to 48.15)
15.28 (8.89 to 26.27)
p,0.001
p,0.001
17.97 (10.38 to 31.13)
11.36 (6.57 to 19.63)
p,0.001
p,0.001
1–2 h/week 2.8% 5.28 (2.95 to 9.47) p,0.001 4.44 (2.47 to 8.00) p,0.001
Less than 1 h/week 2.9% 5.66 (3.14 to 10.21) p,0.001 4.38 (2.42 to 7.94) p,0.001
No sport 0.5% 1.00 1.00
n = 6.911 n = 6.911
Values in parentheses are 95% confidence intervals.
18
16
12
14
10
6
8
4
2
0
Age 50 and over
Age 18–30
Age 30–40
Age 40–50
Percentage
Male athletes (at least 1 h of recreational
physical activity per week)
Female athletes (at least 1 h of recreational
physical activity per week)
Male non-athletes (no sports or less than 1 h
of recreational physical activity per week)
Female non-athletes (no sports or less than 1 h
of recreational physical activity per week)
Figure 3 One year incidence of sports injuries by age, sex, and activity
status. German national health survey.
Table 2 Estimation of total annual sports
injuries by sex and age for the Federal Republic
of Germany (German national health survey)
Sector of
population
Number with
sports injuries
(millions)
Total 2.0
Sex
Female 0.5
Male 1.5
Age (years)
70 to 79 0.0
60 to 69 0.1
50 to 59 0.3
40 to 49 0.4
30 to 39 0.4
Under 30 0.8
Basis: total population aged 18–79 of the Federal Republic
of Germany as on 31 December 2003 (64 028 469).
336 Schneider, Seither, To¨nges, et al
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the study. This procedure follows standard international
epidemiological practice.
5 25–34
We believe that the retro-
spective time window of one year in conjunction with the
18 month survey period effectively offsets seasonal varia-
tions with implications in terms of injury patterns and
frequency.
Only 0.25% of the respondents (n = 17) said that they had
both sustained a sports injury during the preceding year and
not participated in sport during the preceding three months.
It is possible in these 17 cases that the injury itself was the
reason for the reported physical inactivity during the
preceding three months. However, our occupational disability
analyses indicate that sports injuries are rarely that severe.
These in depth analyses provide good grounds to interpret the
extent of physical activity as a causal factor contributing to
the risk of injury in the vast majority of cases.
The national health survey elicited information on injuries
sustained ‘‘during sports/games’’ (to quote the wording). We
believe that it is legitimate to assume that injuries sustained
by adults ‘‘during games’’ will in most cases refer to games or
playful situations occurring during physical activity—for
example, playing football in a park, Frisbee by the pool, etc;
as such, the (probably) fairly low percentage of such cases
can also be legitimately classified as sports injuries. As the
base population comprises adults only, we believe that
playtime accidents typically occurring in children—for
example, in the playground or while playing about with
objects—are insignificant for the purposes of our analysis.
Nevertheless, this terminological indistinctness should not go
unmentioned at this point.
The survey does not cover untreated or fatal sports injuries.
Limiting the survey to treated cases on the one hand results
in an over-representation of comparatively severe injuries, as
speculated.
53334
On the other hand, this procedure reduces
the likelihood of recall bias, as people are more likely to
remember medical consultations than minor injuries requir-
ing no treatment—scrapes, for example.
5303435
. The German
Census Bureau statistics lists 187 deaths in association with
sports and games incidents for the year 2003, 154 of these
accidents having occurred in the over 15 population.
EHLASS, the European Home and Leisure Accidents
Surveillance System, and official German statistics indicate
that fatal sports accidents throughout the EU and Germany
account for only 1% of all fatalities, whereas the correspond-
ing rate for domestic and other leisure time accidents is 50–
60%.
36
Confirmation of national and international findings
and new information
The unique characteristic of this paper is that it generates
population based data on the basis of a nationwide German
population sample with an exclusive focus on sports injuries.
Federal health bulletins and representative data presented
elsewhere either subsume sports injuries under the category
‘‘Domestic and leisure accidents’’
91337
or analyse sports
injuries only in a marginal fashion with no differentiation
according to diagnosis, localisation, and severity.
11 12
Our analyses reveal what German insurance company and
hospital statistics have long indicated
14 15
: a sex ratio of 3:1
and a clear age gradient, with the highest incidence in the
under 30 population. National German health studies in the
past have shown that the high risk group of young men
presented in fig 3 typically engages in ball sports—44% of all
19–26 year old active sport club members play soccer—
whereas 25% of female sport club members of the same age
do gymnastics.
38
This agrees with data from other statistical
analyses indicating that 46% of all sports injuries in Germany
are soccer related. Another male dominated sport, handball,
ranks a poor second (15% of all sports injuries). Gymnastics
injuries account for only 3%.
14
The figures clearly show that,
as might be expected, the sex typical choice of a particular
sport plays a decisive role in determining injury patterns.
As might be expected, the risk of injury also increases with
the time spent exercising and hence presents a ‘‘function of
opportunity’’ (among other factors). Our literature search
disclosed another two studies showing a similar use of the
extent of sporting activity as a predictor of injury risk.
22 31
From the point of view of sports medicine, it can be assumed
that injuries caused by other people (as a result of foul play,
violent contact, or physical combat) would be more likely to
follow the identified ‘‘function of opportunity’’ than other
sports injuries. For these other sports injuries, the relative
risk—that is, per unit of training—might be expected to
decrease as a function of increasing physical fitness and more
extensive training and competitive experience. For future
studies, a more detailed investigation of duration, intensity,
and extent would be desirable.
This typical age, sex, and participation specific pattern for
sporting accidents agrees with data from Canada, the United
States, Australia, and New Zealand.
5 25 28 31 33 34 39–41
Comparison of the types of injury shows, however, that data
from hospital populations seem to be subject to selection
processes. For instance, Steinbru¨ck’s presentation of hospital
data from Stuttgart/Bad Cannstatt
15
reports more distortions
(67%, suspected torn ligaments and menisci), muscle and
tendon injuries, and fewer fractures (11% plus some of the
deformities, a category with a reported incidence of 9%) than
are indicated by our data. A probable explanation is that
those who suffer a sports injury tend to seek treatment at this
kind of sports hospital later and more selectively after
capsular-ligamentous lesions than after sustaining fractures;
our experience suggests that fractures are usually treated
immediately after the trauma event in a surgical outpatients
department or by a readily accessible community based
accident surgeon. Our results in terms of type of injury and
the body region involved are congruent with the results of
descriptive studies from other countries.
53439
Despite differ-
ent preferences in terms of the sports performed, the
observation that the lower extremities are affected two to
What is already known on this topic
N
Univariate and bivariate representative data on sports
injury incidence are available from a number of
western industrialised countries
N
However, descriptive only data do not provide a basis
for calculating the actual injury risk among individual
sectors of the population, as data of this kind do not
address age related and sex related differences in the
extent of physical activity performed
What this study adds
N
This study is the first to provide representative data on
the incidence, type, site, and extent of sports injuries
and their implications in terms of occupational
disability/time off work in the Federal Republic of
Germany
N
These incidence rates are set in relation to actual
sporting activity, and young men present the main high
risk group
Sports injuries 337
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three times more often than the upper extremities seems to
apply across societies and cultures. We can only suppose that
this relation also applies to other sports injuries (ligamentous
injuries, for instance), as the national health survey
provides injury site information only with regard to
fractures.
5282634394243
Our representative data correspond to insurance company
and statistical data also in terms of the injury incidence of
5.6% determined by us in relation to the physically active
population. Germany’s most extensive database to date on
sports injuries puts the injury incidence at 5.1% for those
participating in sport in a club and 5.9% for physically active
people who are not organised in a sports club.
14
However, the
accident event number estimated on the basis of the national
health survey—just below 2 million sports injury victims a
year—is higher than the number generated by the Federal
Work Safety and Occupational Medicine Agency in a
nationwide survey of households (1.3 million). This phenom-
enon is already known from publications on recreational and
road traffic accidents, which are also based on the national
health survey.
12
In conclusion, the national health survey provided a basis
for presenting representative nationwide data on the inci-
dence, type, and risk structure of sports injuries, data that
had not previously been available in such analytical depth.
Firstly, earlier, non-representative calculations from—in
most cases—selective cohorts and populations have now
been objectified and validated. Secondly, the data also show
that sports injuries are a major cause of accidents but are
fairly harmless in terms of severity and occupational
disability in comparison with other types of accident.
Typical injuries are distortions and other injuries of the
capsular-ligamentous apparatus. Thirdly, these investigations
reveal that young men actively engaged in sports are by far
the main risk group. In contrast, sports injuries among
seniors, even those who are mobile and do sport, are a
marginal phenomenon.
We believe that future measures and interventions to
prevent injury should focus primarily on the high risk group
of active young men. Studies on sports participation and
adherence show that psychological factors, in particular fear
of injury, are significant internal barriers to an active
lifestyle.
44
Our findings provide arguments against this view
by showing that this fear is largely unfounded, especially in
the senior population which is so important in terms of
preventive policy.
The exclusion of high risk sports from the standard of
care provided by the German Statutory Health Insurance
system is currently a subject of heated debate. Statutory
health insurance organisations, business associations, and
healthcare institutes with industry affiliations argue that
those engaging in (selected) sports should take out
special insurance or pay an additional premium.
45 46
Sports
clubs respond by arguing that excluding sports injuries would
counteract efforts to implement and promote preventive
healthcare programmes that are based on encouraging
people to exercise more.
47 48
The (former) Chancellor of
Germany pointed out in a government statement that a
separate insurance obligation for sports accidents would
impede, and increase the cost of, sports for children and
adolescents, and would have the same effect on ‘‘sports for
all’’ programmes that are so important in terms of helping to
prevent morbidity.
16
In view of the injury incidences
identified, the cost-benefit ratio presented at the start of
the paper, and the in any case fairly low levels of sporting
participation among lower socioeconomic groups,
49
we
believe that excluding high risk sports such as soccer from
standard healthcare insurance benefits would be a move in
the wrong direction.
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS
This paper received financial support from the independent research
fund of Heidelberg Orthopaedics Foundation at the University of
Heidelberg and arose out of research project F05-0007 ‘‘Sports and
orthopaedic symptoms’’ as an interdisciplinary cooperation between
Heidelberg University Hospital Orthopaedic Foundation and the
Robert Koch Institute (RKI) of Berlin. The sponsor did not influence
the study or this paper in any way. We wish to thank Dr Heribert
Stolzenberg, RKI, for providing access to the dataset and for
immeasurable methodological support and fruitful discussions.
Likewise, this paper would not have been possible without the
supportofHolgerEckhardtMA,SportsScientist,Medical
Department (Internal Medicine VII: Sports Medicine) at Heidelberg
University.
Authors’ affiliations
.....................
S Schneider, S To¨nges, H Schmitt, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery,
University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany
B Seither, Ludwig Maximilians University of Munich, Munich, Germany
Competing interests: none declared
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COMMENTARY
..............
The positive effects of sport on physical and mental health are
undisputed. Unwanted side effects of recreational physical
activity are sports injuries, but most of them are avoidable
and theoretically controllable through the implementation of
preventive measures. To weigh the sports positive against
negative effects on men and women at different ages, it is
important to know the injury frequency and diagnosis. After
identification of groups with frequent occurrences of sports
injuries, preventive measures could be used specifically to
avoid sports injuries in those high risk groups. This paper
gives information on the incidence of injury in the German
population aged 1879 and identifies groups at high risk.
M Zimmermann-Stenzel
Institute of Medical Sociology and Social Medicine, Medical School and
University Hospital, University of Marburg, Marburg, Germany;
mzimmerm@med.uni-marburg.de
Sports injuries 339
www.bjsportmed.com
... Sports injuries have both physical and psychological effects that negatively affect sports performance. Once injured, an athlete may need to abstain from the activity, which may vary from days to months [2]. The longer the withdrawal period, the more common it is to observe detraining, as well as a loss of strength and agility. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Sports injuries have physical and psychological effects that negatively affect sports performance. Although there are data available on sports injuries in wheelchair basketball, some aspects need to be clarified, such as the location, mechanisms and risk factors for injury, which are not well described due to variations and/or a lack of definition of injury. The aim of this study was to determine epidemiological information, primary injury characteristics and affected body regions in wheelchair basketball players; Methods: The PubMed, Science Direct, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases were used; Results: eight articles were included in this review. The shoulder was the body region most affected (N = 60; 22.1%). When divided by body segments, the upper limbs were the most affected (N = 128; 47.2%), followed by the head and/or face (N = 53; 19.5%), trunk (included spine and ribs) (N = 48; 17.8%) and lower limbs (N = 42; 15.5%); Conclusions: wheelchair basketball players suffer a large number of injuries with different characteristics that are mainly linked to biomechanics and sport. These results can be used to guide coaches in structuring training to minimize recurring injuries, in addition to assisting in the organization of medical teams in competitions.
... Hasznosnak bizonyul és biztonságos a testedzés, aggastyánok esetében is. Megfigyelhető, hogy az életkor előrehaladtával, a fizikailag aktív egyéneknél, csökken a sérülések kockázata (Schneider et al., 2006). Idős egyének vonatkozásában további lényeges eredmény, hogy a fizikailag aktív időseket kevésbé fenyegeti az Alzheimer betegség és a demencia kialakulásának kockázata. ...
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Az elmúlt időszakunkat a COVID 19 járvány jegyében éltük át. Nagyon sokan a betegséggel küzdöttek, sokan a hozzátartozóik és barátaik egészsége miatt aggódtak. Mindenkit másképp érintett ez az időszak, de abban egységes, hogy mentálisan mindenkit érintett a bezártság, a korlátozások az interakciók hiánya. Ez az Észak-magyarországi hátrányos helyzetű régió lakosságánál még erőteljesebben manifesztálódik, hiszen a nem megfelelő életkörülmények, és a már eleve fennálló az országos átlagnál rosszabb mentális és szomatikus egészségi állapot, frusztrációt eredményez, mely erőszakos magatartásban nyilvánulhat meg. Kutatási célunk volt feltárni az Észak- magyarországi hátrányos helyzetű régió 18 év feletti felnőtt lakosságának mentális állapotát, agressziós szintjét és annak pandémia időszaka alatti változását. A kutatáshoz a Buss–Perry agresszió kérdőívet alkalmaztuk. Az online mintavétellel megvalósított kohorszvizsgálat nem reprezentatív, viszont a nagyszámú minta jól tükrözi a lakosság mentális állapotát, a különböző vonásagressziók jelenlétét. A járvány III. hullámában a vizsgálatot újra elindítottuk, melyben az agressziós szint változását kívánjuk feltárni. Eredmények. A kérdőívet 528 töltötte ki, áltagéletkoruk 39,4±13,1 év. A megkérdezettek 16,7%-a esett át a COVID-19 fertőzésen, 37,9%-uk bizonytalan abban, hogy átesett-e a betegségen. A betegségen átesett válaszadók többsége (50,4%) enyhe, 47,8% pedig közepes erősségű tünetekkel vészelte át a betegséget. Amikor már a bővebb környezetre kérdeztünk rá, akkor már lényegesen nagyobb arányú megbetegedésről számoltak be: minden válaszadó háztartásában fordult elő fertőzés. A vizsgálatban résztvevők összesített agressziós indexe 64,3±16,2, ami nem éri el a küszöbindexet. A nemek (p=0,008) és az életkor (p=0,0002) tekintetében szignifikáns különbség mutatkozik, a fiatalabb férfiak agressziós indexe, mint az várható is volt magasabb a nők indexénél. A lakóhelyet vizsgálva megfigyelhető, hogy az agressziós index és a lakóhely között szignifikáns különbség található (p=0,05), a nagyvárosokban élőknél a legalacsonyabb az agressziós érték. Szintén szignifikánsan magasabb (p=0,045) az agressziós indexük a Covid-19 fertőzésen átesett egyéneknek. A vonásagressziót vizsgálva megállapítható, hogy a verbális agresszió meghaladja a küszöbértéket, viszont a legmagasabb szórása a hosztilitásnak (sd: 5,94680) volt. Összegzés. A lakosság agressziós szintjének vizsgálata is esetében is azt tapasztaltuk, hogy az értékek nem érték el a küszöbértéket. A férfiak lényegesen agresszívabbak a nőknél, viszont a nagyvárosokban élőknél kevésbé nyilvánul meg az agresszív magatartás. A térségben a verbális agresszió jelenik meg markánsan, de határozottabban van jelen a düh és a hosztilitási index is, ami gyakran szociokulturális magatartási formaként van jelen a hátrányos helyzetű településeken és nem a pandémia alatt manifesztálódott.
... Hasznosnak bizonyul és biztonságos a testedzés, aggastyánok esetében is. Megfigyelhető, hogy az életkor előrehaladtával, a fizikailag aktív egyéneknél, csökken a sérülések kockázata (Schneider et al., 2006). Idős egyének vonatkozásában további lényeges eredmény, hogy a fizikailag aktív időseket kevésbé fenyegeti az Alzheimer betegség és a demencia kialakulásának kockázata. ...
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Full-text available
Lakatos- Rucska: Észlelt stressz a COVID-19 világjárvány második és harmadik hullámában Észak-Magyarországon Elméleti háttér. A 2019 végén megjelent új koronavírus (SARS-CoV-2) 2020 tavaszán Európát, Magyarországot is elérte. A világjárvány egész korábbi életformánkat felborította, erős stressz-forrássá vált. A vírusfertőzéstől való félelmen túl napi életvezetésünk, kapcsolattartási-, tanulási- és munkamódjaink is komoly változáson estek át. A szokásos viselkedési rutinok elvesztésének kellemetlensége mellett sokaknak komoly egzisztenciális nehézségekkel kell szembenézniük, ez további stresszfaktorként van jelen mind a mai napig. Az első hullám lecsengését követően részben visszarendeződött ugyan az élet, ám a járvány 2020 őszén második, majd 2021 tavaszán harmadik hullámban tért vissza. Mivel az egyes hullámok eltérő élethelyzeteket hoztak, a várt hatások is különbözőek lehetnek. Cél. Kutatásunk célja az Észak-kelet magyarországi régió lakosainak mentális állapotfelmérése, a pandémia második és harmadik hullámában tapasztalható pszichológiai jelenségek − az észlelt stressz, az egészségszorongás, a pszichológiai jóllét és a remény összefüggéseinek pontosabb megértése. Módszerek. Kutatásunk első adatfelvétele a világjárvány második hullámában, 2020 decemberében történt. Ebben a szakaszban a kérdőívet 528 fő töltötte ki. Kutatásunk második adatfelvételét a pandémia harmadik hullámának magyarországi megjelenésekor, 2021 márciusában indítottuk el, az adatfelvétel jelenleg is zajlik. A második adatfelvétel kapcsán arra vagyunk kíváncsiak, hogy a járvány természete (gyors terjedés, súlyosabb kórlefolyás) illetve az oltóanyaghoz való hozzáférés, vagy annak hiánya milyen módon befolyásolja a pszichés jelenségeket. Az online survey kutatásba mindkét adatfelvételkor 18. évüket betöltött válaszadók kerültek be. Eredmények. A pandémia második hullámának idején végzett kutatásunk adatfelvételéből származó eredmények egybecsengnek azokkal a nemzetközi és hazai vizsgálatokkal, amelyek a COVID-19 pszichés egészségre gyakorolt negatív hatását igazolták. A vizsgált, szocioökonómiai szempontból hátrányos térségben élők körében nagy biztonsággal megállapítható a pandémia okozta stresszszint, az egészségszorongás szintjének emelkedése és a mentális jóllét romlása közötti összefüggés. Az észlelt stresszszint ugyanakkor fordított összefüggést mutat a remény érzésével, valamint a vallásos hit és a vallási közösséghez való tartozás tényével, azaz az érzelmi megküzdéssel. Összegzés. Bár eredményeink nem reprezentatívak, a minta informatív képet ad az Észak-kelet Magyarországon élők pszichés jellemzőiről a COVID19 világjárvány második és harmadik hullámának idején. Az elemzésben feltárt összefüggések és azokból levonható következtetések elengedhetetlenek a prevenciós és intervenciós munka sikeréhez, és gyakorlati fontossággal bírnak az egészségügyi és szociális területen dolgozó szakemberek számára.
... Hasznosnak bizonyul és biztonságos a testedzés, aggastyánok esetében is. Megfigyelhető, hogy az életkor előrehaladtával, a fizikailag aktív egyéneknél, csökken a sérülések kockázata (Schneider et al., 2006). Idős egyének vonatkozásában további lényeges eredmény, hogy a fizikailag aktív időseket kevésbé fenyegeti az Alzheimer betegség és a demencia kialakulásának kockázata. ...
Book
Full-text available
Perge et all.: Ember-állat interakció: Emocionális hatás vizsgálata menhelyi kutyákkal kialakított kapcsolat során: Fokozódó érdeklődés mutatkozik az ember-állat interakciók lehetséges egészségre gyakorolt kedvező hatásai iránt. Az állatok megfigyelése már önmagában is pozitív hatású. Emocionális hatásait tekintve az állatok képzés és akaratlagos figyelem nélkül is képesek az együttérzésre, állandóság-és biztonságérzést adnak, segítenek fenntartani a lelki egyensúlyt. Szociális hatásai közül lényeges, hogy csökkentik mind az egyedüllétet, mind pedig a magányérzetet. Társaságuk mellett továbbá egy kutya jelenlétében gazdája megközelíthetőbbnek tűnik. Fizikai hatását tekintve pedig a stresszmutatók vonatkozásában is hasznos lehet egy állat közelsége. Jelen kutatás menhelyen élő kutyák sétáltatásával vagy egyéb módon történő kontakt létrejöttével kialakult pozitív hatások mérésére fókuszált. A kutatásban kísérlet történt arra, hogy a kutyák jelenlétének kedvező hatásai olyan környezetben legyenek vizsgálva, amely természetesebb és a kapcsolat kialakítása kevésbé feszélyeztető. A kutatás célja volt megvizsgálni, hogy az ember-kutya interakció milyen szinten járulhat hozzá a stresszel való megküzdéshez, a feszültség csökkentéséhez. Célja volt továbbá beazonosítani a potenciális lehetőségeket, beleértve, hogy a menhelyi kutyákkal történő kapcsolat kialakítása innovatív eszköszként hatékonyan alkalmazható-e az érzelmi állapot javítására. A Miskolci Egyetem Egészségügyi Kar munkatársai a Felsőoktatási Intézményi Kiválósági Program 2018-ban induló több lépcsős kutatásában az Abaúj térségben kezdték meg sokrétű kutatásukat, amelyben a mentális egészség javítására élménydús programok lehetőségét fogalmazták meg, az intervenciós terv elemei között megjelenik többek között a szabadidő és a rekreáció is. Az adatgyűjtés a Spielberger-féle Állapot-Vonás Szorongás Kérdőívvel valósult meg a vizsgálatba bevont menhelyet, telepet látogatók segítségével. Az aktuális érzelmi állapot feltérképezése mellett annak esetleges változása is felmérésre került elő-és utóteszteléssel. A kapott eredmények fontos információt nyújtanak a menhelyen élő kutyákkal történő kontakt hatásáról, amely hozzájárulhat olyan egészségügyi programok kidolgozásához, amelyek mind a kutyákra, mind a gondozást végzőkre pozitív hatással bírhatnak.
... Scholar girls were more likely to have sprains rather than strains 20.8 times. Like it was proven by several studies, sprains are one of the most common injuries sustained by young athletes [2,37] and highly related with traumatic mechanisms [38], due to joint stiffness and abnormal movement mechanics during growth [11]. In addition, concerns about school sports have been raised due to the poor quality of the playing fields, inappropriate protective equipment and inefficient supervision [6], which may also explain the traumatic nature of injuries found in this group. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Growth can make young athletes more vulnerable to sports injuries. Increased knowledge about injury profile and its predictors is an important part of an overall risk management strategy but few studies have produced information. Methods Information about injury profile and sports participation (SP) level was obtained by LESADO and RAPIL II questionnaires. They were distributed to 651 participants aged between 10 and 18 years attending four schools. Maturity measures were evaluated through maturity offset (MO) and Tanner-Whitehouse III method. Bivariate analysis was used to identify the set of candidate predictors for multinomial logistic regression analysis that was used to determine significant predictors of injury type and body area injury location. Results Regarding injury type predictors recreative boys had more chances of having a sprain or a fracture than a strain. Also, recreative and scholar girls had more chances of having a sprain than a strain. As MO decreased, the chances of girls having a strain or a fracture when compared to sprains were higher. For body area location boys with 10–11 years were more likely to have upper limbs injuries than boys of other ages. This was also confirmed by MO. Spine and trunk injuries were more likely to occur in federate and no sports participation girls. Conclusions Injury type and body area injury location differed significantly by SP level, age group and MO.
... Previous work investigating the most common injuries in the sport community include [1]- [4]. It has been concluded that injuries are most common in the lower limbs especially the knee and ankle. ...
Conference Paper
One of the most common injuries in athletes is that of the Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL). This type of injury is commonly analyzed by observing the dynamics of the body in the sagittal plane. ACL injury can be indicated by a the small knee flexion angle and a small angular position of the trunk at start of leg-landing task. In this article a 4 Degrees of Freedom (DOF) dynamic model of the human body restricted to the sagittal plane is presented. The model represents the movement of the legs, an equivalent ligament between the tibia and femur, thighs and trunk. It is used to represent the recovery of vertical posture during a double leg landing task. Initial conditions in velocity are calculated as those resulting from a free fall from a height H. The results obtained from the simulation were satisfactory since the recovery of the vertical posture is achieved and it is possible to approximate the deformation suffered by the equivalent ligament. In conclusion, this model can be very useful in determining the behavior of the ligament and eventually, the possibility of injury after a double-leg landing task.
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У статті наведено дані щодо поширення спортивних травм та сучасних тенденцій застосування різноманітних засобів фізичної реабілітації. Мета. Здійснити аналіз науковометодичної літератури щодо комплексного застосування у програмах фізичної реабілітації найбільш ефективних засобів відновлення спортсменів. Методи. Аналіз та узагальнення спеціальної науково-методичної літератури з питань фізичної реабілітації спортсменів. Результати. Встановлено, що найпоширенішими у різних видах спорту є травми нижніх кінцівок. Сучасна патогенетично-обґрунтована фізична реабілітація спортсменів з травмами опорно-рухового апарату нижніх кінцівок насамперед має бути забезпечена поєднаним застосуванням різних способів консервативного та оперативного лікування і диференціюватися залежно від локалізації травми, її механізму, характеру пошкодження, термінів репаративної регенерації травмованих тканин, періоду відновлення, віку, статі, спортивного стажу, а також специфіки обраного виду спорту. Висновки. Враховуючи необхідність максимально швидкого повернення до тренувальної та змагальної діяльності та максимально ефективного і повного відновлення рухової функції травмованої нижньої кінцівки, одним із перспективних напрямів розвитку реабілітаційних програм є комплексне використання засобів відновлення. Їх застосування дозволить знизити терміни непрацездатності та досягти якісних позитивних змін у процесі одужання.
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