Article

Factors Associated With Health-Related Quality of Life Among Outpatients With Major Depressive Disorder

Department of Psychiatry, Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
The Journal of Clinical Psychiatry (Impact Factor: 5.5). 03/2006; 67(2):185-95. DOI: 10.4088/JCP.v67n0203
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Major depressive disorder (MDD) is often chronic and is often associated with significant morbidity and mortality. The importance of assessing disability and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in patients with MDD has only recently been recognized. The aim of this study was to examine sociodemographic and clinical correlates of HRQOL in a large cohort of outpatients with MDD.
Baseline assessments were completed for 1500 consecutive patients enrolled in the Sequenced Treatment Alternatives to Relieve Depression trial, including sociodemographic characteristics and measures of depressive symptom severity, clinical features, and HRQOL. Multiple domains of HRQOL were assessed with the 12-item Short Form Health Survey, the Work and Social Adjustment Scale, and the Quality of Life Enjoyment and Satisfaction Questionnaire. The current analyses were conducted on HRQOL data available for 1397 of the 1500 subjects.
Greater symptom severity was associated with reduced HRQOL by all measures. Even after age and symptom severity were controlled for, a number of clinical features and sociodemographic characteristics were independently associated with HRQOL in multiple domains, including age at onset of MDD, ethnicity, marital status, employment status, education level, insurance status, and monthly household income.
Results strongly suggest the need to assess HRQOL in addition to symptoms in order to gauge the true severity of MDD. This study also highlights the necessity of measuring HRQOL in multiple domains. These results have implications for the assessment of remission and functional recovery in the treatment of MDD.

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    • "Considering remission, 60–70% of patients with a major depressive episode experience residual symptoms after treatment (Rush et al., 2006), often associated with significant occupational and psychosocial dysfunction, as well as with early relapse and increased recurrence rates (Keller et al., 1992; Trivedi et al., 2006). Taken together, these data have increased the attention on treatment resistant depression (TRD) in the last years. "
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Few studies investigated socio-demographic and clinical predictors of non response and remission in treatment resistant depression (TRD) in the case of failure of more than two adequate antidepressant (AD) trial. The primary aim of this study was to investigate socio-demographic and clinical predictors of TRD defined as the lack of response to at least three adequate AD treatments, two of which prospectively evaluated. As secondary aims, we also investigated predictors of non response and remission to: (1) at least two adequate AD treatment (one of which prospectively assessed); (2) at least one adequate and retrospectively assessed AD treatment. Methods: In the context of a European multicenter project, 407 major depressive disorder (MDD) patients who failed to respond to a previous AD treatment were recruited for a 2 stage trial, firstly receiving venlafaxine and then escitalopram. MINI, HRSD, MADRS, UKU, CGI-S and CGI-I were administered. Results: Ninety eight subjects (27.61%) were considered as resistant to three AD treatments. Clinical predictors were: longer duration and higher severity of the current episode (p=0.004; ES=0.24; p=0.01; RR=1.41, respectively), outpatient status (p=0.04; RR=1.58), higher suicidal risk level (p=0.02; RR=1.49), higher rate of the first/second degree psychiatric antecedents (MDD and others) (p=0.04; RR=1.31, p=0.03; RR=1.32 respectively) and side effects during treatments (p=0.002; RR=2.82). Multivariate analyses underlined the association between TRD and the severity of the current episode (p=0.04). As for secondary outcomes, predicting factors were partially overlapping. Limitations: The limited sample size and specific drugs used limit present findings. Conclusion: Subjects with a high degree of resistance to AD treatments show specific features which may guide the clinicians to the choice of more appropriate therapies at baseline.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
    • "Considering remission, 60–70% of patients with a major depressive episode experience residual symptoms after treatment (Rush et al., 2006), often associated with significant occupational and psychosocial dysfunction, as well as with early relapse and increased recurrence rates (Keller et al., 1992; Trivedi et al., 2006). Taken together, these data have increased the attention on treatment resistant depression (TRD) in the last years. "

    No preview · Article · Oct 2014 · European Neuropsychopharmacology
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    • "Also included will be other factors known to be moderators of depression treatment outcomes. These include demographic factors such as minority status, ethnicity and lower socio-economic status [50] and stress, both current [51,52] and a childhood history of stress [53] (trauma, abuse, neglect) which were collected during the baseline assessment. "
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    ABSTRACT: Major depressive disorder (MDD) is the leading cause of disability in the developed world, yet broadly effective treatments remain elusive. Up to 40% of patients with depression are unresponsive to at least two trials of antidepressant medication and thus have "treatment-resistant depression" (TRD). There is an urgent need for cost-effective, non-pharmacologic, evidence-based treatments for TRD. Mindfulness-Based Cognitive Therapy (MBCT) is an effective treatment for relapse prevention and residual depression in major depression, but has not been previously studied in patients with TRD in a large randomized trial.Methods/design: The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether MBCT is an effective augmentation of antidepressants for adults with MDD who failed to respond to standard pharmacotherapy. MBCT was compared to an active control condition, the Health-Enhancement Program (HEP), which incorporates physical activity, functional movement, music therapy and nutritional advice. HEP was designed as a comparator condition for mindfulness-based interventions to control for non-specific effects. Originally investigated in a non-clinical sample to promote stress reduction, HEP was adapted for a depressed population for this study. Individuals age 18 and older with moderate to severe TRD, who failed to respond to at least two trials of antidepressants in the current episode, were recruited to participate. All participants were taking antidepressants (Treatment as usual; TAU) at the time of enrollment. After signing an informed consent, participants were randomly assigned to either MBCT or HEP condition. Participants were followed for 1 year and assessed at weeks 1-7, 8, 24, 36, and 52. Change in depression severity, rate of treatment response and remission after 8 weeks were the primary outcomes measured by the clinician-rated Hamilton Depression Severity Rating (HAM-D) 17-item scale. The participant-rated Quick Inventory of Depression Symptomology (QIDS-SR) 16-item scale was the secondary outcome measure of depression severity, response, and remission. Treatment-resistant depression entails significant morbidity and has few effective treatments. We studied the effect of augmenting antidepressant medication with MBCT, compared with a HEP control, for patients with TRD. Analyses will focus on clinician and patient assessment of depression, participants' clinical global impression change, employment and social functioning scores and quality of life and satisfaction ratings.Trial registration: ClincalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01021254.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine
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