Expression of endostatin in human choroidal neovascular membranes secondary to age-related macular degeneration

ArticleinExperimental Eye Research 83(2):329-38 · September 2006with8 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.71 · DOI: 10.1016/j.exer.2005.12.017 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Endostatin is an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor which requires E-selectin for its antiangiogenic activity. The aim of this study was to investigate the expression of endostatin in human choroidal neovascular membranes (CNV) secondary to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) with regard to vascularization and proliferative activity. An interventional case series of 36 patients who underwent removal of CNV were retrospectively investigated. Thirty-six CNV were analyzed by light microscopic immunohistochemistry for the expression of CD34 (endothelial cells, EC), CD105 (activated EC), Ki-67 (cell proliferation), Cytokeratin 18 (epithelial cells), VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor), E-selectin and endostatin. Donor eyes (n=7) including one with AMD were used as controls. Endostatin immunoreactivity was present in choroidal vessels of five as well as in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE)-Bruch's membrane complex of two donor eyes without AMD. In one eye with AMD, endostatin was detected in RPE, Bruch's membrane and choroidal vessels. Ninety-two percent (33/36) of CNV disclosed endostatin staining. RPE-Bruch's membrane complex, choroidal vessels and stroma were positive in 50% (18/36), 72% (26/36), and 78% (28/36) of the membranes, respectively. Both control eyes and CNV expressed all the investigated markers except E-selectin being positive only in membranes. Endostatin, an endogenous angiogenesis inhibitor, is expressed in CNV and its therapeutic up-regulation may be a new strategy in the treatment of neovascular AMD.