Accuracy of Pubertal Tanner Staging Self-Reporting

ArticleinJournal of pediatric endocrinology & metabolism: JPEM 19(3):213-21 · April 2006with190 Reads
DOI: 10.1515/JPEM.2006.19.3.213 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Previous studies examining the reliability of self-reported Tanner stages have given conflicting results. We report on the reliability of self-reported Tanner stages in lean healthy children. Self-reported Tanner staging of 240 children (130 girls, 110 boys) were compared to the ratings of a pediatric endocrinologist who was unaware of the children's self-assessments. The correlation between the two approaches was analyzed using kappa statistics. 40% (kappa coeffcient = 0.49, p <0.001) and 23% (kappa coefficient = 0.68, p <0.001) of the girls rated their breast and pubic Tanner stage incorrectly, respectively; 39% of the boys (kappa coefficient = 0.49, p <0.001) rated their pubic stage incorrectly. The age of the children who self-rated correctly and incorrectly was not different; no independent predictors for correct Tanner staging self-assessment were found. The results of this analysis suggest that self-rated Tanner pubertal staging is not influenced by age and is not a reliable method of assessing Tanner stage.
    • "These data in turn may allow an understanding of how puberty hormone change relates to the behavioural aspects of adolescence. Previous work has questioned the validity of self-rated Tanner staging [1,11121314. In this study a high proportion of adolescents completed self-assessment with findings of stable or an advance in Tanner stage at 12 months follow-up in all but 6% of adolescents (who went backwards in a Stage) Self-rated Tanner staging also corresponded well with conventional anthropometric measures of puberty change. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background/Aims The longitudinal relationships of within-individual hormone and anthropometric changes during puberty have not ever been fully described. The objectives of this study were to demonstrate that 3 monthly urine collection was feasible in young adolescents and to utilise liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry assay methods for serum and urine testosterone (T), estradiol (E2) and luteinizing hormone (LH) in adolescents by relating temporal changes in urine and serum hormones over 12 months to standard measures of pubertal development. Methods A community sample of 104 adolescents (57 female) was studied over 12 months with annual anthropometric assessment, blood sampling and self-rated Tanner staging and urine collected every 3 months. Serum and urine sex steroids (T, E2) were measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) and LH by immunoassay. Results A high proportion (92%) of scheduled samples were obtained with low attrition rate of 6.7% over the 12 months. Urine hormone measurements correlated cross-sectionally and longitudinally with age, anthropometry and Tanner stage. Conclusion We have developed a feasible and valid sampling methodology and measurements for puberty hormones in urine, which allows a sampling frequency by which individual pubertal progression in adolescents can be described in depth.
    Full-text · Article · Nov 2015
    • "CI, confidence interval. easiest and arguably most reliable marker of pubertal development (Brooks-Gunn et al., 1987; Desmangles et al., 2006), consideration of earlier puberty markers (e.g. Tanner stage) may be used to confirm our findings and explore related outcomes such as pubertal tempo. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Is sugar-sweetened beverage (SSB) consumption associated with age at menarche? More frequent SSB consumption was associated with earlier menarche in a population of US girls. SSB consumption is associated with metabolic changes that could potentially impact menarcheal timing, but direct associations with age at menarche have yet to be investigated. The Growing up Today Study, a prospective cohort study of 16 875 children of Nurses' Health Study II participants residing in all 50 US states. This analysis followed 5583 girls, aged 9-14 years and premenarcheal at baseline, between 1996 and 2001. During 10 555 person-years of follow-up, 94% (n = 5227) of girls reported their age at menarche, and 3% (n = 159) remained premenarcheal in 2001; 4% (n = 197) of eligible girls were censored, primarily for missing age at menarche. Cumulative updated SSB consumption (composed of non-carbonated fruit drinks, sugar-sweetened soda and iced tea) was calculated using annual Youth/Adolescent Food Frequency Questionnaires from 1996 to 1998. Age at menarche was self-reported annually. The association between SSB consumption and age at menarche was assessed using Cox proportional hazards regression. More frequent SSB consumption predicted earlier menarche. At any given age between 9 and 18.5 years, premenarcheal girls who reported consuming >1.5 servings of SSBs per day were, on average, 24% more likely [95% confidence interval (CI): 13, 36%; P-trend: <0.001] to attain menarche in the next month relative to girls consuming ≤2 servings of SSBs weekly, adjusting for potential confounders including height, but not BMI (considered an intermediate). Correspondingly, girls consuming >1.5 SSBs daily had an estimated 2.7-month earlier menarche (95% CI: -4.1, -1.3 months) relative to those consuming ≤2 SSBs weekly. The frequency of non-carbonated fruit drink (P-trend: 0.03) and sugar-sweetened soda (P-trend: 0.001), but not iced tea (P-trend: 0.49), consumption also predicted earlier menarche. The effect of SSB consumption on age at menarche was observed in every tertile of baseline BMI. Diet soda and fruit juice consumption were not associated with age at menarche. Although we adjusted for a variety of suspected confounders, residual confounding is possible. We did not measure SSB consumption during early childhood, which may be an important window of exposure. More frequent SSB consumption may predict earlier menarche through mechanisms other than increased BMI. Our findings provide further support for public health efforts to reduce SSB consumption. The Growing up Today Study is supported by grant R03 CA 106238. J.L.C. was supported by the Breast Cancer Research Foundation; Training Grant T32ES007069 in Environmental Epidemiology from the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, National Institutes of Health; and Training Grant T32HD060454 in Reproductive, Perinatal and Pediatric Epidemiology from the National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. A.L.F. is supported by the American Cancer Society, Research Scholar Grant in Cancer Control. K.B.M. was supported in part by the National Cancer Institute at the National Institutes of Health (Public Health Service grants R01CA158313 and R03CA170952). There are no conflicts of interest to declare. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.
    Article · Jan 2015
    • "Several studies have evaluated the validity of selfassessment of mammary buds, but results vary greatly. Some reports found concordance greater than 0.7 between self-examination and trained personnel [6,161718, while others found values less than 0.5 [10,192021. Our results on self-assessment agreement by girls are far below those reported by other authors. "
    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2014 · Human Reproduction
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