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Experimental peritonitis induced by oral administration of indomethacin in Mongolian gerbils

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The possibility of inducing peritoneal inflammation in three murine species (gerbils, rats and mice) via the oral administration of indomethacin was investigated with the overall aim of developing an experimental animal model for human peritonitis. Gerbils given high doses of indomethacin at a rate of 30 mg and 40 mg/kg body weight showed swelling of the abdomen, depression and dyspnea within 4 days after the treatment. The severity of the clinical symptoms increased with time. The animals were confirmed as having developed peritonitis based on the pathological features including inflammation of the peritoneum, and fibrinous adhesion of the abdominal organs in the abdominal cavity. The severity of peritonitis increased with increasing dose of indomethacin, and was not related to the gender of the animal. On the other hand, peritoneal inflammation did not develop in the rats and mice even at high doses. Therefore, the administration of 30 mg/kg body weight of indomethacin is an effective and simple method of inducing peritonitis in 5-week-old Mongolian gerbils. The animal peritonitis model used in this study can be used as an effective tool for examining potential therapeutic compounds for preventing peritoneal damage during peritonitis, and provide insight into the pathophysiology of peritonitis.
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... Trabajos más recientes citan datos similares como los obtenidos por nuestro grupo de trabajo, en jerbos macho de 6-8 meses con una media de 48,98% (Cano Rábano et al., 1999), en jerbos de 6-12 meses con valores de 45,00% (Cano Rábano et al. 2001) y los más recientes, aportados por Kim et al. (2006), quienes describen valores medios para jerbos macho con edad de 7 semanas de 40,20 ± 1,57%. ...
... Más recientes son los estudios elaborados por nuestro grupo de trabajo que describen valores de 16,06 g/dl en jerbos macho de 6-8 meses (Cano Rábano et al., 1999) y de 14,90 g/dl en jerbos de 6-12 meses (Cano Rábano et al., 2001) y por Kim et al. (2006) quienes obtienen valores de 11,3 ± 1,54 g/dl para jerbos macho de 7 semanas de edad. ...
... La primera referencia que encontramos en la literatura científica es la de Zeman (1967) quien describe valores medios para jerbos macho de 10 semanas de 63,3 ± 9,0 fl. Posteriormente, Mays (1969) Kim et al. (2006) describen valores altos de VCM, (62 ± 1,0 fl) para jerbos macho de 7 semanas. ...
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