Article

Relationships among sexual satisfaction, marital quality, and marital instability at midlife

Institute for Social and Behavioral Research, Iowa State University, Ames, IA 50011, USA.
Journal of Family Psychology (Impact Factor: 1.89). 07/2006; 20(2):339-43. DOI: 10.1037/0893-3200.20.2.339
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Sexual satisfaction, marital quality, and marital instability have been studied over the life course of couples in many previous studies, but less in relation to each other. On the basis of the longitudinal data from 283 married couples, the authors used autoregressive models in this study to examine the causal sequences among these 3 constructs for husbands and wives separately. Results of cross-lagged models, for both husbands and wives, provided support for the causal sequences that proceed from sexual satisfaction to marital quality, from sexual satisfaction to marital instability, and from marital quality to marital instability. Initially higher levels of sexual satisfaction resulted in an increase in marital quality, which in turn led to a decrease in marital instability over time. Effects of sexual satisfaction on marital instability appear to have been mediated through marital quality.

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    • "However, the impact on their intimate relationship continues to be unexamined in the literature. Also, despite research linking differentiation, coping, and sexual desire to relationship and sexual satisfaction among the general population (Brezsnyak & Whisman, 2004; Leiblum et al., 2006; McCarthy & Wald, 2012; Murdock & Gore, 2004; Yeh et al., 2006) past research does not suggest whether or not these findings extend to parents of children with special needs. Given the lack of empirical support in this area of research and based on the literature reviewed earlier, several factors associated with parents of children with special needs were examined in this study. "
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    ABSTRACT: The present study examined relationship and sexual satisfaction of parents of children with special needs. The impact of role differentiation, coping styles, and sexual desire on relationship and sexual satisfaction were measured, as well as the link between relationship and sexual satisfaction of parents (N = 62). Results from the study indicate that several dimensions were significantly correlated with both sexual (e.g., reframing coping strategies and sexual desire) and relationship (e.g., emotional reactivity, reframing coping strategies) satisfaction. Evidence from this study suggests that therapists should be attentive and sensitive to particular issues to help parents of children with special needs improve their relationship and sexual satisfaction.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015 · Journal of Family Psychotherapy
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    • "Additionally, because this is one of the first studies to explore the associations between mindfulness, sexual satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction in dating relationships , we sought to further clarify the relationships among these factors by contrasting our proposed mediated model with an alternative mediated model. Since individuals' levels of trait mindfulness have been shown to positively influence sexual functioning (see Atkinson, 2013) and sexual satisfaction predicts relationship satisfaction over time (Sprecher, 2002; Yeh et al., 2006) we elected to conceptualize sexual satisfaction as a mediating variable in the link between mindfulness and relationship satisfaction, such that individuals with higher levels of trait mindfulness (as measured by the five facets) would have more satisfied sexual relationships with their partners, thereby contributing to greater overall relationship satisfaction. However, previous research has also demonstrated that sexual satisfaction and relationship satisfaction often influence each other bidirectionally over time (Byers, 2005; Sprecher & Cate, 2004) and are highly correlated (Mark & Murray, 2012; Montesi, Fauber, Gordon, & Heimberg, 2011). "
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of the present study was to examine the links among the five facets of trait mindfulness, sexual satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction in dating relationships. Three hundred and twenty-two individuals in a current dating relationship completed measures of trait mindfulness, sexual satisfaction, and relationship satisfaction. Results of path analyses indicated that sexual satisfaction fully mediated the associations between the Observing (PE = .08, CI = [.02, .15]) and Nonjudging of Inner Experience (PE = .11, CI = [.03, .19]) facets of mindfulness and relationship satisfaction. In contrast, the three remaining facets of mindfulness (Describing, Acting with Awareness, and Nonreactivity to Inner Experience) were not related to sexual satisfaction or relationship satisfaction. These results suggest that attending to and noticing (but refraining from evaluating) internal and external stimuli may contribute to greater relationship satisfaction specifically by increasing sexual satisfaction with one's partner. Furthermore, findings from the current study provide empirical support for the link between mindfulness and sexual satisfaction in dating relationships and suggest that they may jointly contribute to relationship satisfaction, thus indicating an important area for future research and suggesting a potential target for relationship education and intervention efforts.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2015 · Sexual and Relationship Therapy
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    • "Indeed, as noted earlier, the one study that documented a positive association between initial sexual satisfaction and subsequent relationship satisfaction (Yeh et al., 2006) was based on five waves of data. Of course, the Yeh et al. (2006) study did not detect a significant association between initial relationship satisfaction and changes in sexual satisfaction. A second methodological quality of that study may explain that null effect: Yeh et al. sampled from couples in relatively established marriages. "
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    ABSTRACT: The current research used two 8-wave longitudinal studies spanning the first 4–5 years of 207 marriages to examine the potential bidirectional associations among marital satisfaction, sexual satisfaction, and frequency of sex. All three variables declined over time, though the rate of decline in each variable became increasingly less steep. Controlling for these changes, own marital and sexual satisfaction were bidirectionally positively associated with one another; higher levels of marital satisfaction at one wave of assessment predicted more positive changes in sexual satisfaction from that assessment to the next and higher levels of sexual satisfaction at one wave of assessment predicted more positive changes in marital satisfaction from that assessment to the next. Likewise, own sexual satisfaction and frequency of sex were bidirectionally positively associated with one another. Additionally, partner sexual satisfaction positively predicted changes in frequency of sex and own sexual satisfaction among husbands, yet partner marital satisfaction negatively predicted changes in both frequency of sex and own sexual satisfaction. Controlling these associations, marital satisfaction did not directly predict changes in frequency of sex or vice versa. Only the association between partner sexual satisfaction and changes in own sexual satisfaction varied across men and women and none of the key effects varied across the studies. These findings suggest that sexual and relationship satisfaction are intricately intertwined and thus that interventions to treat and prevent marital distress may benefit by targeting the sexual relationship and interventions to treat and prevent sexual distress in marriage may benefit by targeting the marital relationship.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2014 · Archives of Sexual Behavior
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