Article

Update of the Providence Health System experience with the CarboMedics prosthesis.

Providence Health System, Portland, Oregon, USA.
The Journal of heart valve disease (Impact Factor: 0.75). 06/2006; 15(3):414-20.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The study aim was to update the authors' experience with the CarboMedics bileaflet mechanical prosthesis in terms of early and long-term outcomes.
Between July 1994 and April 2005, a total of 774 CarboMedics valves was implanted at two Providence Health System hospitals in Portland Service Area. Of these valves, 406 (59%) were aortic valve replacements (AVR), 196 (28.5%) were mitral valve replacements (MVR), and 86 pairs (12.5%) were double valve replacements (DVR).
The mean and maximum follow up was 4.6 and 10.2 years, respectively; total follow up was 3,150 patient-years (pt-yr) (total 3,503 valve-years). Operative mortality was 5.7% (4.4% for AVR, 7.7% for MVR, 7.0% for DVR). Five- and 10-year survivals respectively were 79 +/- 2% and 55 +/- 10% for AVR, 74 +/- 3% and 57 +/- 8% for MVR, and 64 +/- 6% and 39 +/- 11% for DVR (p = 0.009). Freedom from valve explant at five and 10 years respectively was 98 +/- 1% and 97 +/- 10% for AVR, 98 +/- 1% and 86 +/- 12% for MVR, and 96 +/- 3% and 96 +/- 3% for DVR (p = 0.950). Freedom from thromboembolism at five and 10 years respectively was 93 +/- 1% and 91 +/- 2% for AVR, 97 +/- 1% and 95 +/- 2% for MVR, and 90 +/- 4% and 90 4% for DVR (p = 0.226). Freedom from bleeding at five and 10 years respectively was 98 +/- 1% and 97 +/- 1% for AVR, 97 +/- 1% and 96 +/- 2% for MVR, and 91 +/- 4% and 91 +/- 4% for DVR (p = 0.006). Freedom from endocarditis at five and 10 years respectively was 99 +/- 1% and 99 +/- 1% for AVR, 98 +/- 1% and 98 +/- 1% for MVR, and 95 +/- 3% and 91 +/- 4% for DVR (p = 0.030). There were nine perivalvular leaks (six after AVR, three after MVR), and three valve thromboses (two after MVR, one after DVR). Freedom from overall valve-related events at five and 10 years respectively was 80 +/- 2% and 74 +/- 3% for AVR, 82 +/- 3% and 57 +/- 11% for MVR, and 69 +/- 6% and 66 +/- 6% for DVR (p = 0.074).
Long-term experience with the CarboMedics valve shows the clinical performance of the valve to be very good, with results comparable to those obtained with other mechanical valves.

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