Article

Training Standards in Implant Dentistry for General Dental Practitioners. A Report

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Abstract

In December 2005, the General Dental Council (GDC) convened a small working group to consider training standards for general dental practitioners (GDPs) who wish to practise implant dentistry. The membership of this group is given at the end of this report. The secretariat for the group was provided jointly by the GDC and the Faculty of General Dental Practice (UK). The remit of the group (which was independent of any organisation) was to consider what training standards would be necessary for a GDP before practising implant dentistry, to publish those standards, and then periodically to review them in the light of developments in implant dentistry. Such standards can be used not only by practitioners but also by the GDC in the consideration of patient complaints against dental practitioners who, allegedly, practise implant dentistry beyond the limits of their competence.

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Article
Many patients travel abroad seeking cosmetic dental treatment, in particular dental implants. However, there are hundreds of dental implant systems being used globally by dentists of all training backgrounds. Furthermore, complications can occur that patients may expect their general dental practitioner in the UK to be able to manage. The following report describes the case of a 71-year-old, medically compromised patient who presented with complaints consistent with the immediate failure of dental implants that happened to be placed abroad. On closer examination, the dental implants themselves were highly questionable in their design and placement. An incidental finding was also made in the maxillary sinus. CPD/Clinical Relevance: To acknowledge that implant dentistry is increasing in popularity as patients have the freedom to access dental implant treatment globally. UK dentists are expected to manage these dental implants on the return of patients to the UK who may present with post-operative complications involving unknown dental implant systems.
Article
Objectives Dental implants have become a well-publicised treatment modality in dentistry. Implants are generally placed in the private sector by dentists who have undertaken further learning. The continued maintenance of implants falls within the duty of care for the general dental practitioner. The objective of this qualitative study is to investigate the current status of dental implants in general dental practice, and to explore the dentists view on dental implant education at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. Methods In-depth interviews as a qualitative methodology was used in the study. The participants were recruited through theoretical sampling guided by saturation of information. Based on this, 22 general dental practitioners practicing in the UK were interviewed. Transcribed interview data were coded with NVIVO software and then analysed using a thematic framework analysis method. Results General dentists from different educational backgrounds, experience levels participated in the study. They highlighted that the guidelines and protocols when dealing with implants were unclear and expressed their unwillingness to treat patients who had their specialised dental treatment performed elsewhere. Conclusion Expensive dental implant treatment is not being followed up by the general dental practitioner due to a wide range of barriers. Unclear care paths will lead to a likely increase in problems following implant placement. Clinical Significance General Dentists’ views of dental implants in general practice and their expectations from education providers are explored and show the need for improved education.
Article
Objectives: Thanks to their predictably high-success rates, dental implants have gained a firm place among the treatment options for edentulous and partially dentate patients in state-of-the-art dentistry. As a result, the need for high-level basic and continued training in implant dentistry is increasing. The present questionnaire-based survey was designed to shed light on the current state of implant training, any points of criticism and the need for a standardized training format in Europe. Material and methods: Between July and November 2006, a 14-item questionnaire was sent to 37 opinion leaders in 29 European countries. The questionnaires sent back were processed electronically and evaluated statistically. Results: 82.8% of the participating opinion leaders responded. In the majority of the participating countries (87.5%), courses are funded by the industry. Most of the courses (43%) are confined to a few days and mainly consist of lectures in theory and hands-on training. Of the attendees, most are general dental practitioners (29%). These perform as many implant treatments as specialized dentists. In 83% of the participating countries, a standardized certified training format in implant dentistry is considered to be required. Conclusion: As implant dentistry is increasingly shifting from competence centers to general dental practitioners in the practice setting, standardized training concluded with a certified diploma has become necessary. This would provide for more transparency and for disseminating state-of-the-art knowledge independent of the implant-manufacturing industry.
Article
Thanks to their predictably high-success rates, dental implants have gained a firm place among the treatment options for edentulous and partially dentate patients in state-of-the-art dentistry. As a result, the need for high-level basic and continued training in implant dentistry is increasing. The present questionnaire-based survey was designed to shed light on the current state of implant training, any points of criticism and the need for a standardized training format in Europe. Between July and November 2006, a 14-item questionnaire was sent to 37 opinion leaders in 29 European countries. The questionnaires sent back were processed electronically and evaluated statistically. 82.8% of the participating opinion leaders responded. In the majority of the participating countries (87.5%), courses are funded by the industry. Most of the courses (43%) are confined to a few days and mainly consist of lectures in theory and hands-on training. Of the attendees, most are general dental practitioners (29%). These perform as many implant treatments as specialized dentists. In 83% of the participating countries, a standardized certified training format in implant dentistry is considered to be required. As implant dentistry is increasingly shifting from competence centers to general dental practitioners in the practice setting, standardized training concluded with a certified diploma has become necessary. This would provide for more transparency and for disseminating state-of-the-art knowledge independent of the implant-manufacturing industry.
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