Article

Physical and sexual assault of women with disabilities. Violence Against Women, 12, 823-837

Department of Maternal and Child Health, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, NC, USA.
Violence Against Women (Impact Factor: 1.33). 10/2006; 12(9):823-37. DOI: 10.1177/1077801206292672
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

North Carolina women were surveyed to examine whether women's disability status was associated with their risk of being assaulted within the past year. Women's violence experiences were classified into three groups: no violence, physical assault only (without sexual assault), and sexual assault (with or without physical assault). Multivariable analysis revealed that women with disabilities were not significantly more likely than women without disabilities to have experienced physical assault alone within the past year (odds ratio [OR] = 1.18, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] = 0.62 to 2.27); however, women with disabilities had more than 4 times the odds of experiencing sexual assault in the past year compared to women without disabilities (OR = 4.89, 95% CI = 2.21 to 10.83).

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Kathryn E Moracco
  • Source
    • "This is supported by Saxton et al. (2001), who found that disabled women are less likely to get support or are prevented from accessing other sources of support when they are reliant on their abuser. At the same time, in cases where the perpetrator is also the disabled girl's/woman's assistant, they may be particularly reluctant to make a charge for fear they would be left with no one to provide the personal care they require to live independently (Kennedy, 1996; Martin et al., 2006). Apart from the barriers caused by perpetrators, much evidence suggests that disabled women face several obstacles when seeking professional support, which is open to non-disabled women (Thiara et al., 2012). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Violence against women is a worldwide social and human rights problem that cuts across cultural, geographic, religious, social, and economic boundaries. It affects women in countries around the world, regardless of class, religion, disability, age, or sexual identity. International evidence shows that approximately three in five women experienced physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner. However, across the globe, women and girls with impairments or life-limiting illnesses are more susceptible to different forms of violence across a range of environments and by different perpetrators including professionals and family members as well as partners. However, they are likely to be seriously disadvantaged in gaining information and support to escape the abusive relationships. This article stems from the United Kingdom part of a comparative study with three other countries (Austria, Germany, and Iceland) funded by the European Commission (EC; 2013-2015). It presents preliminary findings, generated from life history interviews, about disabled women's experiences of violence and access to support (both formal and informal) over their life course and their aspirations for the prevention of violence in the future. The article includes examples of impairment-specific violence that non-disabled women do not experience. By bringing the voices of disabled women into the public domain, the article will facilitate a historically marginalized group to contribute to the debate about disability, violence, and support.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Violence Against Women
  • Source
    • "This is supported by Saxton et al. (2001), who found that disabled women are less likely to get support or are prevented from accessing other sources of support when they are reliant on their abuser. At the same time, in cases where the perpetrator is also the disabled girl's/woman's assistant, they may be particularly reluctant to make a charge for fear they would be left with no one to provide the personal care they require to live independently (Kennedy, 1996; Martin et al., 2006). Apart from the barriers caused by perpetrators, much evidence suggests that disabled women face several obstacles when seeking professional support, which is open to non-disabled women (Thiara et al., 2012). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Violence against women is a worldwide social and human rights problem that cuts across cultural, geographical, religious, social and economic boundaries. It affects women in countries around the world, regardless of class, religion, disability, age or sexual identity. International evidence shows that approximately every 3 to 5 women experienced physical and/or sexual violence by an intimate partner. However, across the globe, women and girls with impairments or life-limiting illnesses are more susceptible to different forms of violence across a range of environments and by different perpetrators including professionals and family members as well as partners. However they are likely to be seriously disadvantaged in gaining information and support to escape the abusive relationships. This paper stems from the UK part of an ongoing four country comparative study (2013-15) funded by the European Commission. It presents preliminary findings, generated from life history interviews, about disabled women’s experiences of violence and access to support (both formal and informal) over their lifecourse, and their aspirations for the prevention of violence in the future. The paper includes examples of impairment-specific violence not experienced by non-disabled women. By bringing the voices of disabled women into the public domain, the paper will facilitate a historically marginalised group to contribute to the debate about disability, violence and support.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2016 · Violence Against Women
  • Source
    • "A national study on transgender discrimination (Grant et al., 2011) found that 12% of transgender individuals had been sexually assaulted within the K–12 grade school environment, 2% were sexually assaulted by police officers, and 15% were sexually assaulted in prison. Additionally, a study on women with disabilities found the risk of rape was more than four times greater than that of women without disabilities (Martin et al., 2006).Weaknesses. A major weakness of postmodern feminist conceptualization of rape is the very dense language and complexity of the concepts that make them difficult to translate into applied practice by frontline practitioners. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: The radical-liberal feminist perspective on rape posits that the assault is motivated by power and control rather than sexual gratification and is a violent rather than a sexual act. However, rape is a complex act. Relying on only one early strand of feminist thought to explain the etiology of rape limits feminists' understanding of rape and the practice based upon the theory. The history of the adoption of the "power, not sex" theory is presented and the model critiqued. A more integrated model is developed and presented, the Feminist Framework Plus, which knits together five feminist theories into a comprehensive model that better explains the depth and breadth of the etiology of rape. Empirical evidence that supports each theory is detailed as well as the implications of the model on service provision, education, and advocacy. © The Author(s) 2015.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Trauma Violence & Abuse
Show more