Article

The Health Status of Young Adults in the United States

Department of Pediatrics, Division of Adolescent Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California 94143-0503, USA.
Journal of Adolescent Health (Impact Factor: 3.61). 10/2006; 39(3):305-17. DOI: 10.1016/j.jadohealth.2006.04.017
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The health issues of young adulthood have received relatively little attention compared with those of adolescence, although the critical issues in young adulthood parallel those of adolescence. Young adults often fare worse than adolescents on health indicators, with many measures of negative outcomes--including rates of injury, homicide, and substance use--peaking during the young adult years. The contextual factors shaping health status and access to care in young adulthood differ significantly from the context of adolescence. This article synthesizes national data to present a health profile of young adults, reviewing social indicators that describe the context of young adulthood and presenting measures of health status. We examine mortality, morbidity, risky behaviors, and health care access and utilization, identifying the most significant gender and racial/ethnic disparities. The article also identifies limitations of existing data and offers suggestions for future research and health monitoring in this area. We conclude with a discussion of current efforts to address the health and well-being of young adults and argue for creating a national health agenda for young adults that includes research, programs and policies to address health issues during this period of the lifespan.

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    • "Such gender differences in adolescent maturity have been found in other studies on health status of young adults. In particular, girls seem to achieve developmental milestones such as marriage, living independently, and having children earlier than boys (Park et al., 2006), and girls mature earlier, as measured by ego development, and the gender gap is not closed until mid-adulthood (Cohn, 1991). Our findings are also similar to studies of emerging adulthood which found that young women had higher relational maturity and expectations in terms of emerging adult skills (Nelson et al., 2007). "

    Full-text · Article · Jul 2014
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    • "Such gender differences in adolescent maturity have been found in other studies on health status of young adults. In particular, girls seem to achieve developmental milestones such as marriage, living independently, and having children earlier than boys (Park et al., 2006), and girls mature earlier, as measured by ego development, and the gender gap is not closed until mid-adulthood (Cohn, 1991). Our findings are also similar to studies of emerging adulthood which found that young women had higher relational maturity and expectations in terms of emerging adult skills (Nelson et al., 2007). "
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    • "Yet, the road to adulthood involves exploring various levels of independence and responsibilities under adult supervision . This transition from adolescence into young adulthood is often characterized by going off to college, joining the military, marrying and becoming a parent [2]. This transition period can affect one's health and medicine use due to increases in the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, obesity, smoking and alcohol use, as well as decreases in physical activity practice [3]. "
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