Article

Parental beliefs about autism Implications for the treating physician

Department of Pediatrics, New York Medical College,Valhalla, NY 10595, USA.
Autism (Impact Factor: 3.5). 10/2006; 10(5):452-62. DOI: 10.1177/1362361306066609
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study investigated parental beliefs about the etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of autism spectrum disorders. Sixty-two families of affected children completed a questionnaire asking when the parent first noticed developmental or behavioral problems, when they were told the diagnosis, how confident they were about the ability of their child's physician to recognize autism, whether they believed anything specific might have caused their child's autism, and what medications and complementary or alternative therapies they had tried. Two-thirds of parents suspected a specific cause, and three-quarters questioned their physician's ability. Parents who perceived a greater delay in diagnosis or who had tried more different therapies both tended to have less confidence in their physician (p = 0.20 and p = 0.07, respectively). Physicians should inquire about parental beliefs concerning etiology, learn what treatments the children are receiving, perform screening at the 18 month visit, and make referrals for further evaluation as soon as a child begins to exhibit signs suggestive of autism.

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Available from: Donald A Brand, Jan 06, 2014
    • "Previous surveys among various groups of healthcare providers reported gaps in knowledge about ASD, deficiencies in diagnostic abilities, and a lack of self-perceived competency in treating children with autism (Bakare et al. 2009, 2008; Eseigbe et al. 2015; Garg et al. 2014; Golnik et al. 2009; Hartley-McAndrew et al. 2014; Heidgerken et al. 2005; Igwe et al. 2011; Imran et al. 2011; Khanna and Jariwala 2012; Nicolaidis et al. 2015; Oskoui and Wolfson 2012; Rahbar et al. 2011). Parents of children with autism also expressed low confidence in (Harrington et al. 2006) and dissatisfaction with their children's physicians (Liptak et al. 2006). As children with ASD age, their healthcare services move from the pediatric department to adult medicine, yet very little is known about providers' readiness to provide optimal care for adults with ASD. "
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    ABSTRACT: We conducted an online survey of adult health care providers at Kaiser Permanente Northern California and semi-structured interviews with a subset of physicians. The survey assessed providers' ability to recognize autism spectrum disorder (ASD), asked them to rate their autism knowledge, comfort level in treating affected patients, and evaluated training and resource needs. 922 providers completed the survey (response rate 25.3 %), and 9 were interviewed by telephone regarding their autism training and experiences caring for patients with autism. Most providers reported lacking skills and tools to care for this adult patient population. A high proportion of adult providers were not aware that they had patients with ASD. These findings underscore the need to educate physicians caring for adults with ASD.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders
    • "Previous surveys among various groups of healthcare providers reported gaps in knowledge about ASD, deficiencies in diagnostic abilities, and a lack of self-perceived competency in treating children with autism (Bakare et al. 2009, 2008; Eseigbe et al. 2015; Garg et al. 2014; Golnik et al. 2009; Hartley-McAndrew et al. 2014; Heidgerken et al. 2005; Igwe et al. 2011; Imran et al. 2011; Khanna and Jariwala 2012; Nicolaidis et al. 2015; Oskoui and Wolfson 2012; Rahbar et al. 2011). Parents of children with autism also expressed low confidence in (Harrington et al. 2006) and dissatisfaction with their children's physicians (Liptak et al. 2006). As children with ASD age, their healthcare services move from the pediatric department to adult medicine, yet very little is known about providers' readiness to provide optimal care for adults with ASD. "
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    ABSTRACT: Compared to the general pediatric population, children with autism have higher rates of co-occurring medical and psychiatric illnesses, yet very little is known about the general health status of adults with autism. The objective of this study was to describe the frequency of psychiatric and medical conditions among a large, diverse, insured population of adults with autism in the United States. Participants were adult members of Kaiser Permanente Northern California enrolled from 2008 to 2012. Autism spectrum disorder cases (N = 1507) were adults with autism spectrum disorder diagnoses (International Classification of Diseases-9-Clinical Modification codes 299.0, 299.8, 299.9) recorded in medical records on at least two separate occasions. Controls (N = 15,070) were adults without any autism spectrum disorder diagnoses sampled at a 10:1 ratio and frequency matched to cases on sex and age. Adults with autism had significantly increased rates of all major psychiatric disorders including depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, schizophrenia, and suicide attempts. Nearly all medical conditions were significantly more common in adults with autism, including immune conditions, gastrointestinal and sleep disorders, seizure, obesity, dyslipidemia, hypertension, and diabetes. Rarer conditions, such as stroke and Parkinson's disease, were also significantly more common among adults with autism. Future research is needed to understand the social, healthcare access, and biological factors underlying these observations. © The Author(s) 2015.
    No preview · Article · Apr 2015 · Autism
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    • "Such treatments may be of special concern when seemingly extraordinary results are guaranteed. Such concerns may be confounded when physicians fail to anticipate or understand the feelings of desperation that accompany some parents of children with ASD when they come into the office [2]. The combination of desperation and a lack of effective treatment options provided by the physician may lead parents to pursue treatments with little or no empirical support. "
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    ABSTRACT: The purpose of this paper is to review and critique studies that have been conducted on dolphin-assisted therapy for children with various disorders. Studies have been released claiming swimming with dolphins is therapeutic and beneficial for children with autism, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, physical disabilities, and other psychological disorders. The majority of the studies conducted supporting the effectiveness of dolphin-assisted therapy have been found to have major methodological concerns making it impossible to draw valid conclusions. Readers will be informed of the history of, theory behind, and variations of dolphin-assisted therapy along with a review and critique of studies published which purportedly support its use.
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