Article

Will Filmed Presentations of Education and Contact Diminish Mental Illness Stigma?

Institute of Psychology, Illinois Institute of Technology, Chicago, IL 60616, USA.
Community Mental Health Journal (Impact Factor: 1.03). 05/2007; 43(2):171-81. DOI: 10.1007/s10597-006-9061-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study examines the impact of two versions of anti-stigma programs-education and contact-presented on videotape. A total of 244 people were randomly assigned to education or contact conditions and completed pre-test, post-test, and follow-up measures of stereotypes. Results suggest that the education videotape had limited effects, mostly showing improvement in responsibility (people with mental illness are not to blame for their symptoms and disabilities). Watching the contact videotaped showed significant improvement in pity, empowerment, coercion, and segregation. Contact effects were evident at post-test and 1 week follow-up. Implications of these findings for future research are discussed.

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Available from: Jonathon Eugene Larson, Jan 03, 2016
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    • "In this study, after viewing the documentary film, the willingness for social distance significantly declined in the Film group but not in the Control group. This confirms our hypothesis and previous studies that also used filmed contact to change attitudes towards schizophrenia (Brown et al., 2010; Corrigan et al., 2007). These findings are promising as they suggest that a documentary film promoting indirect contact with people diagnosed with schizophrenia does not only have an effect on increasing knowledge about that illness, but also on improving certain attitudes towards people diagnosed with schizophrenia. "
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    ABSTRACT: Stereotypes about schizophrenia may lead to prejudicial attitudes and discrimination with debilitating effects on people diagnosed with schizophrenia. There is thus a need to develop interventions aiming to prevent, reduce or eliminate such stereotypes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a documentary film on schizophrenia on cognitive, affective and behavioural aspects of stigmatisation. Forty-nine participants were assessed on measures of stereotypes and social distance, and on the Model of Stereotype Content, which includes measures of stereotypes, emotional reactions and behavioural tendencies. Participants were randomly assigned into either a condition in which they viewed the documentary film (Film group), or into a control condition in which no intervention was conducted (Control group). Only participants in the Film group revealed a significant decrease of negative stereotypes (Dangerousness and Unpredictability) and desired Social distance, and a significant increase in the perception of sociability in persons with schizophrenia. Small sample size and its reduced generalizability are the main limitations in this study. These findings suggest that a documentary film promoting indirect contact with people diagnosed with schizophrenia is a promising tool to prevent and reduce stigmatisation regarding schizophrenia.. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2016 · Journal of Behavior Therapy and Experimental Psychiatry
    • "Contact-based education refers to the involvement of people with lived experience of mental illnesses in sharing their personal stories with audiences and conveying positive messages about recovery. Research has been undertaken to provide evidence for the contactbased approach in reducing stigma associated with mental illnesses (Corrigan et al. 2007;Chan et al. 2009;Stuart 2006;Pinfold et al. 2005a;Altindag et al. 2006;Mino et al. 2001;Schulze et al. 2003;Wood and Wahl 2006;Pinfold et al. 2003). These outcome studies adopted different formats for contact (such as direct contact, video contact, or workshops led by people with lived experience) and demonstrated significant improvements in knowledge, attitudes, and behavioural intent. "
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    ABSTRACT: This study evaluated eighteen Canadian anti-stigma programs targeting high-school students. The purpose was to identify critical domains and develop a program model of contact-based interventions. Three steps were implemented. The first step involved collecting program information through twenty in-depth interviews with stakeholders and field observations of seven programs. The second step involved constructing critical ingredients into domains for conceptual clarity and component modeling. The third step involved validating the program model by stakeholders review and initial fidelity testing with program outcomes. A program model with an overarching theme "engaging contact reduces stigma" and three underlying constructs (speakers, message, and interaction) were developed. Within each construct three specific domains were identified to explain the concepts. Connection, engagement, and empowerment are critical domains of anti-stigma programs for the youth population. Findings from this study have built on the scientific knowledge about the change theory underpinning youth contact-based intervention.
    No preview · Article · Oct 2015 · Community Mental Health Journal
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    • "In this study, after viewing the documentary film, the willingness for social distance significantly declined in the Film group but not in the Control group. This confirms our hypothesis and previous studies that also used filmed contact to change attitudes towards schizophrenia (Brown et al., 2010; Corrigan et al., 2007). These findings are promising as they suggest that a documentary film promoting indirect contact with people diagnosed with schizophrenia does not only have an effect on increasing knowledge about that illness, but also on improving certain attitudes towards people diagnosed with schizophrenia. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Sep 2015
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