Article

Sexual behaviour in context: A global perspective

London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK.
The Lancet (Impact Factor: 45.22). 12/2006; 368(9548):1706-28. DOI: 10.1016/S0140-6736(06)69479-8
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Research aimed at investigating sexual behaviour and assessing interventions to improve sexual health has increased in recent decades. The resulting data, despite regional differences in quantity and quality, provide a historically unique opportunity to describe patterns of sexual behaviour and their implications for attempts to protect sexual health at the beginning of the 21st century. In this paper we present original analyses of sexual behaviour data from 59 countries for which they were available. The data show substantial diversity in sexual behaviour by region and sex. No universal trend towards earlier sexual intercourse has occurred, but the shift towards later marriage in most countries has led to an increase in premarital sex, the prevalence of which is generally higher in developed countries than in developing countries, and is higher in men than in women. Monogamy is the dominant pattern everywhere, but having had two or more sexual partners in the past year is more common in men than in women, and reported rates are higher in industrialised than in non-industrialised countries. Condom use has increased in prevalence almost everywhere, but rates remain low in many developing countries.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Kaye Wellings
    • "Gender norms is a crucial social determinant of sexual health as it can influence one's sexual identity, practices and behavior, and the way in which one enacts his sexuality (WHW, 2011). For men, the cultural ideology of masculinity and what it means to be a " man " encourages young men to actively engage in sexual activity to prove their virility (Wellings et al., 2006). Young men who hold traditional attitudes toward masculinity report having more sexual partners (Pleck, Sonenstein, & Ku, 1993). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Young Black men (YBM), aged 13 to 24 years, face a disproportionate burden of sexually transmitted infections (STIs). STI acquisition among YBM is due to incorrect and inconsistent condom use and is exacerbated by multiple sexual partners. Sexual and reproductive health is influenced by a complex interaction of biological, psychological, and social determinants that contribute to increased risk for STI acquisition. However, there are key social determinants of sexual health that play a major role in adolescent sexual risk-taking behaviors: gender norms, environment, peers, and families as well as a desire to impregnate a woman. Associations between contextual factors (risky environmental context, desire to impregnate a woman, and peer norms supportive of unsafe sex) and sexual risk behaviors were examined among a sample of YBM attending adolescent health clinics. This study used baseline data from a randomized controlled trial (N = 702). Parental monitoring was also examined as an effect modifier of those associations. Sexual risk behaviors were the frequency of condomless vaginal sex, number of sexual partners within the previous 2 months, and lifetime number of sexual partners. Mean age was 19.7. In the adjusted model, peer norms was the only significant predictor for all sexual risk outcomes (p < .05). Parental monitoring was an effect modifier for the perceived peer norms and lifetime sexual partners association (p = .053) where the effect of peer norms on lifetime sexual partners was lower for participants with higher levels of perceived parental monitoring.
    No preview · Article · Nov 2015 · American Journal of Men s Health
  • Source
    • "Sexual behavior is socially regulated, via social mores and expectations, and through codified regulations such as those proclaimed by organized religion and, in certain parts of the world, the state (Wellings et al., 2006). Not unlike feeding, sex can become disengaged from its biological and hedonistic functions. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Sexual behavior is a complex phenomenon. While appetitive and linked to reproduction, it also has a strong hedonic component to it. Like other human behaviors, it is dimensional and, although it may fall along a continuum of normality, it may also deviate in a variety of directions. Selling and buying sex is one of said deviations. We report the case of a young man with an autism spectrum disorder who began to sell himself in exchange for money in a country where sex selling, or prostitution, is not in and of itself illegal. The case is noteworthy as it explores issues of freedom of will, capacity to consent to sexual relations in an individual with a clinically diagnosed psychiatric condition at risk for victimization, exploitation of the disabled, and medico-legal responsibility. We likewise underscore the clinical complexity of assessing the relationship between moral understanding, cognitive skills, and sanctionable and risky behaviors.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Forensic Psychology Practice
  • Source
    • "Sexual behavior is socially regulated, via social mores and expectations, and through codified regulations such as those proclaimed by organized religion and, in certain parts of the world, the state (Wellings et al., 2006). Not unlike feeding, sex can become disengaged from its biological and hedonistic functions. "

    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015
Show more