Mastopexy Preferences: A Survey of Board-Certified Plastic Surgeons

ArticleinPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery 118(7):1631-8 · January 2007with24 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.99 · DOI: 10.1097/01.prs.0000248397.83578.aa · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    The purpose of this survey was to assess the current trends in mastopexy techniques and to compare satisfaction rates and complications associated with different techniques.
    In September of 2002, a mastopexy survey was sent to 1500 members of the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery; 487 complete responses were received, for a response rate of 32.5 percent. Questions elicited categorical answers, and the data were evaluated using the chi-square test and the comparison of two proportions.
    The inverted-T incision technique is the most popular. Satisfaction was reported to be highest with the short scar periareolar inferior pedicle reduction (or SPAIR) and Hall-Findlay techniques. Physician satisfaction was lowest with the periareolar technique. The three most common complications for all techniques were suture spitting, excess scarring, and bottoming out. The periareolar group had a greater frequency of revision (p = 0.002). The inverted-T group had a greater frequency of bottoming out (p = 0.043). The short scar group had a greater frequency of asymmetry (p = 0.008).
    The traditional inverted-T technique is the most popular, but the newer short scar techniques have become more popular in the last 5 years. The inverted-T incision continues to be associated with bottoming out and excess scarring. The periareolar technique has the greatest need for revision and the lowest physician satisfaction, despite its application to a greater volume of mastopexies per year.