Article

Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) (2006) General recommendations on immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP)

Immunization Services Division, National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (proposed), CDC, Atlanta, GA 30333, USA. ,
MMWR. Recommendations and reports: Morbidity and mortality weekly report. Recommendations and reports / Centers for Disease Control 01/2007; 55(RR-15):1-48.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This report is a revision of General Recommendations on Immunization and updates the 2002 statement by the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) (CDC. General recommendations on immunization: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices and the American Academy of Family Physicians. MMWR 2002;51[No. RR-2]). This report is intended to serve as a general reference on vaccines and immunization. The principal changes include 1) expansion of the discussion of vaccination spacing and timing; 2) an increased emphasis on the importance of injection technique/age/body mass in determining appropriate needle length; 3) expansion of the discussion of storage and handling of vaccines, with a table defining the appropriate storage temperature range for inactivated and live vaccines; 4) expansion of the discussion of altered immunocompetence, including new recommendations about use of live-attenuated vaccines with therapeutic monoclonal antibodies; and 5) minor changes to the recommendations about vaccination during pregnancy and vaccination of internationally adopted children, in accordance with new ACIP vaccine-specific recommendations for use of inactivated influenza vaccine and hepatitis B vaccine. The most recent ACIP recommendations for each specific vaccine should be consulted for comprehensive discussion. This report, ACIP recommendations for each vaccine, and other information about vaccination can be accessed at CDC's National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases (proposed) (formerly known as the National Immunization Program) website at http//:www.cdc.gov/nip.

0 Followers
 · 
21 Reads
  • Source
    • "For those who had been vaccinated against measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid and reduced diphtheria toxoid (Td), booster of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids should be done every ten years. For American Committee of Immunisations Practice (ACIP) one of the tetanus boosters should include pertussis (Tdap), independent of the age group or medical condition [14] [15]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Immunosuppression induced by drugs increase the risk of infections in Crohn's disease (CD) patients. The vaccination rate in CD patients is usually low due to inaccurate information concerning the safety and efficacy of vaccines. Vaccines and immunoglobulins, are artificial ways of protection from common infectious diseases and they have had a major effect on mortality. Herein we detail the need of protection induced by vaccines of measles, varicella, Zoster, papillomavirus, shingles, pneumococcal invasive disease, influenza, hepatitis A and B in CD at diagnosis and during the course of the disease even during immunosuppression periods but with different singularities. Vaccination in CD travelers and the matters related to immunization of household healthy members of immunosuppressed patients are also discussed.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Baillière&#x027 s Best Practice and Research in Clinical Gastroenterology
  • Source
    • "This finding supports the conclusion that, similar to many other inactivated vaccines, the number of vaccinations is most important for the mounting of a long-lasting antibody response after a TBE catch-up or booster dose, regardless of the time intervals between previous TBE vaccinations. This is in accordance with national recommendations which emphasize that extended vaccination intervals usually do not reduce the antibody response to subsequent vaccinations [14] [15]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Intervals longer than recommended are frequently encountered between doses of tick borne encephalitis virus (TBE) vaccines in both residents of and travelers to endemic regions. In clinical practice the management of individuals with lapsed TBE vaccination schedules varies widely and has in common that the underlying immunological evidence is scarce. The aim of this study was to generate data reliable enough to derive practical recommendations on how to continue vaccination with FSME-IMMUN in subjects with an irregular TBE vaccination history. Antibody response to a single catch-up dose of FSME-IMMUN was assessed in 1115 adults (age ≥16 years) and 125 children (age 6-15 years) with irregular TBE vaccination histories. Subjects of all age groups developed a substantial increase in geometric mean antibody concentration after a single catch-up TBE vaccination which was consistently lower in subjects with only one previous TBE vaccination compared to subjects with two or more vaccinations. Overall, >94% of young adults and children, and >93% of elderly subjects with an irregular TBE vaccination history achieved antibody levels ≥25U/ml irrespective of the number of previous TBE vaccinations. We conclude that TBE vaccination of subjects with irregular vaccination histories should be continued as if the previous vaccinations had been administered in a regular manner, with the stage of the vaccination schedule being determined by the number of previous vaccinations. Although lapsed vaccination schedules may leave subjects temporarily with inadequate protection against TBE infection, adequate protection can quickly be re-established in >93% of the subjects by a single catch-up dose of FSME-IMMUN, irrespective of age, number of previous vaccinations, and time interval since the last vaccination.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2014 · Vaccine
  • Source
    • "For those who had been vaccinated against measles, mumps, rubella, polio, hepatitis B, tetanus toxoid and reduced diphtheria toxoid (Td), booster of tetanus and diphtheria toxoids should be done every ten years. For American Committee of Immunisations Practice (ACIP) one of the tetanus boosters should include pertussis (Tdap), independent of the age group or medical condition [14] [15]. "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014
Show more