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Biocompatibility of furcal perforation repair material using cell culture technique: Ketac Molar versus Pro-Root MTA

Department of Operative Dentistry, Faculty of Dentistry, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. <>
Oral Surgery, Oral Medicine, Oral Pathology, Oral Radiology, and Endodontology (Impact Factor: 1.46). 01/2007; 102(6):e48-50. DOI: 10.1016/j.tripleo.2006.05.015
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The objective of this study was to evaluate the cytotoxicity of furcal perforation repair materials, GI and MTA, using cell culture technique.
The extract of ProRoot MTA and Ketac Molar were treated on PDL cells in a 96-well tissue-culture plate. Cell proliferation after an incubation period of 3 days was determined by using MTT assay.
The growth of cultured human periodontal fibroblast cells were suppressed by both perforation repair materials. The percent of cell viability in the Ketac Molar group was lower than in the ProRoot MTA group (P = .000).
Although Ketac Molar has the advantage of adhering to dentine, it is more cytotoxic to the PDL cells than MTA. In selecting the perforation repair material, it is recommended not only to consider the sealing ability of the material with dentine but also the biocompatibility of material to the underlying tissue.

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    • "The ideal material for sealing perforations should be biocompatible, non-toxic, bactericidal or bacteriostatic, radiopaque, non-absorbent, and good seal. Moreover, they should possess the ability to induce osteogenesis and cementogenesis [4] [5] [6]. "
    Dataset: Haghgoo

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2014
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    • "The ideal material for sealing perforations should be biocompatible, non-toxic, bactericidal or bacteriostatic, radiopaque, non-absorbent, and good seal. Moreover, they should possess the ability to induce osteogenesis and cementogenesis [4] [5] [6]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Iatrogenic furcal perforation is a procedural accident in endodontic treatments of primary/permanent teeth; prognosis may be favorable if a complete seal with biomaterial is immediately established. The purpose of this in vitro study was to evaluate microleakage of calcium enriched mixture (CEM) cement and ProRoot mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) for sealing primary molar furcal perforations. This study was conducted on 38 extracted human primary molars. Furcation perforations were created in the pulp chamber floor. The teeth were divided randomly in two experimental groups (n=17) and two positive and negative controls (n=2). Perforations were then repaired with biomaterials. After 72 h, the teeth were submerged in 2% fuchsin dye solution for 24h. The samples were sectioned longitudinally and evaluated for dye leakage. Data analyzed statistically using ANOVA test. The negative and positive controls behaved as expected. Dye microleakage was observed in all experimental samples; however, there was no statistically significant difference between the microleakage of MTA (4.411±2.042 mm) and CEM (3.647±1.040 mm) groups (P>0.05). Based on the findings of this in vitro study, CEM and tooth-colored ProRoot MTA have similar sealing ability for furcal perforation repair of primary molar teeth.
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    • "Therefore, when used as a root repair material, moisture must be provided from the internal aspect of the root (using a moist cotton pellet).[7] The Mineral Trioxide Aggregate was initially introduced as a root end filling material, however, because of its biocompatibility it is now also considered as a material of choice to seal perforations.[89111214] Although Mineral Trioxide Aggregate is an expensive material, it has become indispensible in procedures such as perforation repair.[1315] "
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    ABSTRACT: Root perforation repair has historically been an unpredictable treatment modality, with an unacceptably high rate of clinical failure. Recent developments in the techniques and materials utilized in root perforation repair have dramatically enhanced the prognosis of both surgical and nonsurgical procedures. Mineral Trioxide Aggregate is a relatively new material that is being successfully used to repair perforations. Technological advancements such as the use of a Dental Operating Microscope for correction of these inevitable procedural errors are a major breakthrough in dentistry today. This article presents one clinical case of nonsurgical root perforation repair by Mineral Trioxide Aggregate, using the Dental Operating Microscope.
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