Article

Artificial fingerprint recognition by using optical coherence tomography with autocorrelation analysis

University of Houston, Houston, Texas, United States
Applied Optics (Impact Factor: 1.78). 01/2007; 45(36):9238-45. DOI: 10.1364/AO.45.009238
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Fingerprint recognition is one of the most widely used methods of biometrics. This method relies on the surface topography of a finger and, thus, is potentially vulnerable for spoofing by artificial dummies with embedded fingerprints. In this study, we applied the optical coherence tomography (OCT) technique to distinguish artificial materials commonly used for spoofing fingerprint scanning systems from the real skin. Several artificial fingerprint dummies made from household cement and liquid silicone rubber were prepared and tested using a commercial fingerprint reader and an OCT system. While the artificial fingerprints easily spoofed the commercial fingerprint reader, OCT images revealed the presence of them at all times. We also demonstrated that an autocorrelation analysis of the OCT images could be potentially used in automatic recognition systems.

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    • "OCT is capable of providing a highresolution 3D representation of the fingertip skin, within which multiple levels of fingerprint information reside [6]. It can also be successfully applied to spoof-and liveness-detection [7], [8], [9]. More importantly, OCT is able to image the subsurface fingerprint [6], [10], [11], [12]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Physiologists have found that fingerprint patterns exist in the inner layers (viz. papillary junction) of the skin of the fingertip. However, conventional acquisition systems do not have capabilities to extract fingerprints at subsurface layers of the finger for use in identity authentication. The subsurface fingerprint representation is of a higher quality than the surface representation as it does not contain deformations such as creases or scars which may be present on the surface of the fingertip. This paper presents a novel approach to extract the subsurface fingerprint representation using a high-resolution imaging technology known as Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT).
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015
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    • "OCT is able to provide a high resolution three-dimensional representation of fingertip skin. This technique has been shown as a potential means of mitigating disadvantages associated with conventional fingerprints [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Current surface fingerprint scanners measure the surface topography of skin, resulting in vulnerabilities to surface skin erosion, distortion due to contact with the scanner, and fingerprint counterfeiting. An improved means of fingerprint acquisition is necessitated in these facts. By employing an imaging technique known as Optical Coherence Tomography to the human fingertip skin, a three-dimensional digital reconstruction of subsurface layers of skin can be used for the extraction of an internal fingerprint. The internal fingerprint is robust towards counterfeiting, damage, and distortion, thus providing a replacement for the surface fingerprint. However, OCT scans are corrupted by speckle noise and have low contrast, resulting in a poor quality fingerprint representation. This research applies image enhancement procedures to OCT scan images to improve internal fingerprint quality. Furthermore, a novel internal fingerprint mapping technique is presented: papillary junction detection followed by defined region mapping. With a RMS-contrast improvement of 97%, this technique yields a much higher quality internal fingerprint when compared to previous techniques.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Feb 2015
  • Source
    • "OCT is able to provide a high resolution three-dimensional representation of fingertip skin. This technique has been shown as a potential means of mitigating disadvantages associated with conventional fingerprints [5], [6], [7], [8], [9]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Current surface fingerprint scanners measure the surface topography of skin, resulting in vulnerabilities to surface skin erosion, distortion due to contact with the scanner, and fingerprint counterfeiting. An improved means of fingerprint acquisition is necessitated in these facts. By employing an imaging technique known as Optical Coherence Tomography to the human fingertip skin, a three-dimensional digital reconstruction of subsurface layers of skin can be used for the extraction of an internal fingerprint. The internal fingerprint is robust towards counterfeiting, damage, and distortion, thus providing a replacement for the surface fingerprint. However, OCT scans are corrupted by speckle noise and have low contrast, resulting in a poor quality fingerprint representation. This research applies image enhancement procedures to OCT scan images to improve internal fingerprint quality. Furthermore, a novel internal fingerprint mapping technique is presented: papillary junction detection followed by defined region mapping. With a RMS-contrast improvement of 97%, this technique yields a much higher quality internal fingerprint when compared to previous techniques.
    Full-text · Conference Paper · Feb 2015
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