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Family history of alcoholism and the stability of personality in young adulthood

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The authors examined the magnitude and durability of personality differences related to family history of alcoholism (FH) and the development of alcohol use disorders (AUDs) in late adolescence and early adulthood. Data were taken from a longitudinal sample (N = 487; approximately half FH-positive [+]) who completed the Eysenck Personality Questionnaire (H. J. Eysenck & S. B. G. Eysenck, 1975) at 3 points spanning 11 years (participants were 18 years old at baseline). Hierarchical linear analyses showed that FH+ participants had higher levels of neuroticism and psychoticism over the study period, independent of AUD. Despite relatively large mean decreases in neuroticism (as well as extraversion), the magnitude of the between-groups differences found at age 18 were maintained over the next decade. These changes thus reflect stable underlying differences in personality and not artifacts of higher rates of AUDs in FH+ individuals, recently living in an alcoholic home, vulnerability to the developmental challenge of leaving home, and/or a developmental lag.
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... Os 18 estudos da amostra final foram distribuídos segundo o ano de publicação, da seguinte forma: nenhuma publicação em 2005;,uma em 2006 (11) , quatro em 2007 (12)(13)(14)(15)(16) , 8 em 2008 (17)(18)(19)(20)(21)(22)(23)(24) e 4 em 2009 (25)(26)(27)(28) . ...
... Os países que mais desenvolveram estudos na área temática descrita foram os Estados Unidos com 11 artigos (13-14;19-20,22,24-26,28) e Coreia (23,27) , com 2 artigos; mas ainda foram desenvolvidos artigos na Dinamarca (15) , China (18) , Espanha (17) , Alemanha (16) e Holanda (21) , cada país com uma produção. Quanto ao tipo de estudo usado, houve predominância de estudos longitudinais (11,15,(20)(21)(22)(24)(25) , caso e controle (18,26) e transversal (12,(19)(20) . Destaca-se, em relação à abordagem metodológica, um estudo realizado durante 21 anos por meio de avaliação intergeracional (14) (3 gerações) e estudos que avaliaram o alcoolismo apenas maternal (21,26) . ...
... Os resultados apontam o alcoolismo parental (materno ou paterno) como importante fator de risco para o desenvolvimento de problemas relacionados à bebida alcoólica na adolescência (11)(12)15,20) , sendo que a influência familiar tem papel mais forte no desenvolvimento do alcoolismo do que na remissão ou recuperação da dependência (15) . ...
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... For example, the prevalence of all DSM-IV personality disorders is higher among persons exposed to PPD than those not exposed [10; see also 11]. PPD exposure has also been linked to higher neuroticism [12][13][14][15], greater introversion [16], but also greater extraversion [13] and lower conscientiousness [13,17,18], lower agreeableness [13,17], and lower openness to experience [13], but also greater openness to experience [17]. There are also studies showing no association between PPD exposure and neuroticism, extraversion, openness, or agreeableness [17][18][19][20][21]. Therefore, additional research is needed. ...
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... Besides, stress may also enhance carcinogenesis through changes in DNA repair and/or apoptosis (47). Moreover, individuals with higher neuroticism tend to live less healthy lifestyles, including cigarette smoking (48), alcohol consumption (49), obesity (50) and physical inactivity (51), which may lead to an increased risk of lung cancer. However, the exact underlying mechanisms linking neuroticism to lung cancer still need to be elucidated by further research. ...
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... Higher scores indicate greater levels of neuroticism. Neuroticism has been shown to be associated with greater risk for AUD (Larkins and Sher, 2006). ...
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... The relationship between neuroticism and health is somewhat unclear. Many studies have found that neuroticism is associated with worse health, including greater participation in unhealthy behaviors like smoking and drinking (Larkins & Sher, 2006;Turiano, Chapman, Gruenewald, & Mroczek, 2015;, more reported somatic symptoms (Watson & Pennebaker, 1989), have higher body mass indexes (Terracciano et al., 2009), higher rates of chronic diseases (Nakaya et al., 2003;Weston, Hill, & Jackson, 2015), and greater mortality (for a metaanalysis, see Roberts, Kuncel, Shiner, Caspi, & Goldberg, 2007). ...
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