Health, Preventive Health Care, and Health Care Access among Women with Disabilities in the 1994–1995 National Health Interview Survey, Supplement on Disability

ArticleinWomen s Health Issues 16(6):297-312 · November 2006with12 Reads
Impact Factor: 2.33 · DOI: 10.1016/j.whi.2006.10.002 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    This study presents national estimates on the health, preventive health care, and health care access of adult women with disabilities. We compared women with 1 or 2 functional limitations (FLs) and > or =3 FLs with women with no FLs. Topics covered included demographic characteristics, selected reported health measures, selected clinical preventive services, and selected access to care indicators and health care coverage.
    Estimates in this report were based on data from the 1994-1995 National Health Interview Survey, Supplement on Disability (NHIS-D). The sample size for women > or =18 years of age used in producing the estimates from the combined 1994 and 1995 NHIS-D was 77,762.
    An estimated 16% of women > or =18 years of age had difficulty with at least 1 FL. Women with FLs were less likely to rate their health as excellent or very good and more likely to report their health as fair or poor when compared with women with no FLs. Women with FLs were also more likely to report being a current smoker, having hypertension, being overweight, and experiencing mental health problems. Among women > or =65 years of age, those with FLs were also less likely to have received Pap smear tests within the past year and those with > or =3 FLs were less likely to have received mammograms within the past year than women with no FLs. Women with > or =3 FLs were more likely to report being unable to get general medical care, dental care, prescription medicines, or eyeglasses, regardless of age group, compared with women with no FLs. The main reasons reported for being unable to receive general care were financial problems or limitations in insurance. These findings suggest that increased attention to the health care needs of women with disabilities from researchers, clinicians, and public health professionals is warranted.