Article

A Comparison of Serratus Anterior Muscle Activation During a Wall Slide Exercise and Other Traditional Exercises

Program in Physical Therapy, Washington University, St Louis, MO, USA.
Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy (Impact Factor: 3.01). 01/2007; 36(12):903-10. DOI: 10.2519/jospt.2006.2306
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Single-group repeated-measures design.
To investigate the ability of the wall slide exercise to activate the serratus anterior muscle (SA) at and above 90 degrees of humeral elevation.
Strengthening of the SA is a critical component of rehabilitation for patients with shoulder impingement syndromes. Traditional SA exercises have included scapular protraction exercises such as the push-up plus. These exercises promote activation of the SA near 90 degrees of humeral elevation, but not in positions above 90 degrees where patients typically experience pain.
Twenty healthy subjects were studied performing 3 exercises: (1) wall slide, (2) plus phase of a wall push-up plus, and (3) scapular plane shoulder elevation. Three-dimensional position of the thorax, scapula, and humerus and muscle activity from the SA, upper and lower trapezius, and latissimus dorsi were recorded. The magnitudes of activation for each muscle at 90 degrees, 120 degrees, and 140 degrees of humeral elevation were quantified from EMG records. Repeated-measures analyses of variance were used to determine the degree to which the different exercises activated the SA at the 3 humeral positions.
The intensity of SA activity was not significantly different between the 3 exercises at 90 degrees of humeral elevation (P = .40). For the wall slide and scapular plane shoulder elevation exercises, SA activity increased with increasing humeral elevation angle (P = .001), with no significant differences between the 2 exercises (P = .36).
The wall slide is an effective exercise to activate the SA muscle at and above 90 degrees of shoulder elevation. During this exercise, SA activation is not significantly different from SA activation during the push-up plus and scapular plane shoulder elevation, 2 exercises previously validated in the literature.

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Available from: Catherine E Lang, Aug 14, 2014
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    • "However, in the present study, we used the modified gross stretching exercise to allow the investigator to better control the amount of applied overpressure to the glenohumeral joint and anterior shift of the humeral head and to avoid unwanted movement , such as elevation of the ribcage, during the stretching. In addition, many previous studies have investigated various exercises to determine the most effective exercise to elicit LT and SA strengthening (Arlotta et al., 2011; Ekstrom et al., 2003; Ha et al., 2012; Hardwick et al., 2006; Pontillo et al., 2007). The V raise exercise in the prone position might be the most efficient method to strengthen the LT for stabilizing the scapula on the thoracic wall. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jul 2015
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    • "SA/LS muscle activity ratio was also significantly greater at 150° than at 30° (by 170.5%). Hardwick et al. (2006) reported greater muscle activity of the SA during scaption and wall slide at 140° of humeral elevation than that at 90° or 120°, emphasizing the importance of exercise above 90° for optimal generation in SA muscle activity. SA muscle activity has been reported to increase gradually with arm abduction (Bagg and Forrest, 1986; Neumann, 2013). "
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    • "However, in the present study, we used the modified gross stretching exercise to allow the investigator to better control the amount of applied overpressure to the glenohumeral joint and anterior shift of the humeral head and to avoid unwanted movement , such as elevation of the ribcage, during the stretching. In addition, many previous studies have investigated various exercises to determine the most effective exercise to elicit LT and SA strengthening (Arlotta et al., 2011; Ekstrom et al., 2003; Ha et al., 2012; Hardwick et al., 2006; Pontillo et al., 2007). The V raise exercise in the prone position might be the most efficient method to strengthen the LT for stabilizing the scapula on the thoracic wall. "
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