Generators of the intracranial P50 response in auditory sensory gating

Article (PDF Available)inNeuroImage 35(2):814-26 · May 2007with51 Reads
DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2006.12.011 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
Clarification of the cortical mechanisms underlying auditory sensory gating may advance our understanding of brain dysfunctions associated with schizophrenia. To this end, data from nine epilepsy patients who participated in an auditory paired-click paradigm during pre-surgical evaluation and had grids of electrodes covering temporal and frontal lobe were analyzed. A distributed source localization approach was applied to the intracranial P50 response and the Gating Difference Wave obtained by subtracting the response to the second stimuli from the response to the first stimuli. Source reconstruction of the P50 showed that the main generators of the response were localized in the temporal lobes. The analysis also suggested that the maximum neuronal activity contributing to the amplitude reduction in the P50 time range (phenomenon of auditory sensory gating) is localized at the frontal lobe. Present findings suggest that while the temporal lobe is the main generator of the P50 component, the frontal lobe seems to be a substantial contributor to the process of sensory gating as observed from scalp recordings.
    • "Furthermore, developmental changes within the prefrontal cortex that lead to changes in attentional control may result in sensory gating improvements with age (Knight, Staines, Swick, & Chao, 1999; Marshall, Bar-Haim, & Fox, 2004). Further support for top-down influences on sensory gating has emerged from ERP studies which have found significant correlations between measures of frontal lobe dysfunction and sensory gating (Boutros et al., 2009), as well as P50 generators within the frontal lobes (Grunwald et al., 2003; Korzyukov et al., 2007; Liu, Xiao, Shi, & Zhao, 2011; Mears, Klein, & Cromwell, 2006). "
    Full-text · Article · Oct 2016
    • "In this loop, the thalamus acts as a " gate, " allowing the primary stimulus to reach the cortex while inhibiting subsequent or redundant information . provided evidence of limited gating of the PSEP in young healthy adults, and more specifically that central processing of mechanical stimulation to the pharyngeal wall is different than other somatosensory modalities i.e. respiratory-related (Chan and Davenport, 2009; Chan and Davenport, 2008) and auditory (Korzyukov et al., 2007) which had significant suppression of the second stimulus event. We hypothesize that limited gating of pharyngeal mechanical stimulation is advantageous for effective airway protection, due to the timecourse of the pharyngeal phase of swallow and the ability of humans to perform sequential swallow tasks. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Movement of a food bolus from the oral cavity into the oropharynx activates pharyngeal sensory mechanoreceptors. Using electroencephalography, somatosensory cortical-evoked potentials resulting from oropharyngeal mechanical stimulation (PSEP) have been studied in young healthy individuals. However, limited information is known about changes in processing of oropharyngeal afferent signals with Parkinson's disease (PD). To determine if sensory changes occurred with a mechanical stimulus (air-puff) to the oropharynx, two stimuli (S1-first; S2-second) were delivered 500ms apart. Seven healthy older adults (HOA; 3 male and 4 female; 72.2+/- 6.9 years of age), and thirteen persons diagnosed with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD; 11 male and 2 female; 67.2+/- 8.9 years of age) participated. Results demonstrated PSEP P1, N1, and P2 component peaks were identified in all participants, and the N2 peak was present in 17/20 participants. Additionally, the PD participants had a decreased N2 latency and gated the P1, P2, and N2 responses (S2/S1 under 0.6). Compared to the HOAs, the PD participants had greater evidence of gating the P1 and N2 component peaks. These results suggest that persons with PD experience changes in sensory processing of mechanical stimulation of the pharynx to a greater degree than age-matched controls. In conclusion, the altered processing of sensory feedback from the pharynx may contribute to disordered swallow in patients with PD.
    Full-text · Article · Apr 2016
    • "Furthermore, developmental changes within the prefrontal cortex that lead to changes in attentional control may result in sensory gating improvements with age (Knight, Staines, Swick, & Chao, 1999; Marshall, Bar-Haim, & Fox, 2004). Further support for top-down influences on sensory gating has emerged from ERP studies which have found significant correlations between measures of frontal lobe dysfunction and sensory gating (Boutros et al., 2009), as well as P50 generators within the frontal lobes (Grunwald et al., 2003; Korzyukov et al., 2007; Liu, Xiao, Shi, & Zhao, 2011; Mears, Klein, & Cromwell, 2006). "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Sensory gating is a neurophysiological measure of inhibition that is characterised by a reduction in the P50 event-related potential to a repeated identical stimulus. The objective of this work was to determine the cognitive mechanisms that relate to the neurological phenomenon of auditory sensory gating. Sixty participants underwent a battery of 10 cognitive tasks, including qualitatively different measures of attentional inhibition, working memory, and fluid intelligence. Participants additionally completed a paired-stimulus paradigm as a measure of auditory sensory gating. A correlational analysis revealed that several tasks correlated significantly with sensory gating. However once fluid intelligence and working memory were accounted for, only a measure of latent inhibition and accuracy scores on the continuous performance task showed significant sensitivity to sensory gating. We conclude that sensory gating reflects the identification of goal-irrelevant information at the encoding (input) stage and the subsequent ability to selectively attend to goal-relevant information based on that previous identification.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2016
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