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An extract of Pelargonium sidoides (EPs 7630) inhibits in situ adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to human stomach

Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology and Phytochemistry, University of Münster, Hittorfstrasse 56, D-48149 Münster, Germany.
Phytomedicine (Impact Factor: 3.13). 05/2007; 14(4):285-8. DOI: 10.1016/j.phymed.2006.12.008
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Root extract from Pelargonium sidoides DC is used therapeutically as antimicrobial agent against infections of the respiratory system. In order to elucidate possible modes of actions we investigated the influence of P. sidoides root extract on microbial adhesion with Helicobacter pylori as model microorganism, a germ with a strong adherence to human stomach tissue. In an in-situ anti-adhesion assay intact human stomach tissue from patient resectates was incubated with fluorescent-labelled bacteria. Epithelial adhesion occurred in untreated samples and was quantified by fluorescent microscopy. Pre-treatment of the bacteria with Pelargonium extract showed good anti-adhesive activity. The antiadhesive effect was clearly dose-dependent in a range from 0.001 to 10 mg/ml. Within agar diffusion-test the extract had no direct cytotoxicity against H. pylori. The results show that the root extract from Pelargonium sidoides is a potent anti-adhesive agent against H. pylori and could therefore be a useful choice to avoid the first step of a bacterial infection.

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Available from: Andreas Hensel, Jan 11, 2016
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    • "The reported pharmacological studies on the genus and Clinical trials investigating its use as phytopharmaceutical preparations, indicated that Pelargonium species proved to be effective in treatment of many diseases depending on their antimicrobial activities as acute bronchitis (Theisen and Muller, 2012), peptic ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori (Wittschier et al., 2007). P. x fragrans Known as Nutmeg- Scented geranium is a perennial small shrub with Spicy, pine-like fragrance, It has three lobed heart shaped grayish green leaves having trailing clusters of very small whitish flowers with pink veins (Bailey, 1949). "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015
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    • "The reported pharmacological studies on the genus and Clinical trials investigating its use as phytopharmaceutical preparations, indicated that Pelargonium species proved to be effective in treatment of many diseases depending on their antimicrobial activities as acute bronchitis (Theisen and Muller, 2012), peptic ulcer due to Helicobacter pylori (Wittschier et al., 2007). P. x fragrans Known as Nutmeg- Scented geranium is a perennial small shrub with Spicy, pine-like fragrance, It has three lobed heart shaped grayish green leaves having trailing clusters of very small whitish flowers with pink veins (Bailey, 1949). "
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    ABSTRACT: documents/Vol4Issue2/01.pdf © 2015 Singab et al.; licensee Saki Publishing Club. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nd/3.0/), which permits unrestricted use (including commercial use), distribution and reproduction of the work in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited and remain unaltered.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015
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    • "Historically, the identification of antiadhesive compounds against H. pylori has been based on the initial finding of antiadhesive properties of 3′-sialyllactose [4]; unfortunately, this compound failed to prevent bacterial colonizaton of human stomach in a preliminary clinical study [5], likely owing to degradation of the compound under physiological conditions in the stomach. The search for additional antiadhesive compounds has yielded peptides [6], polyphenols [7]–[8], N-phenylpropenoyl-L-amino acid amides [9], and polysaccharides [10]–[11] that interact with bacterial outer membrane proteins (OMPs). The clinical and economic development of such antiadhesives is still underrepresented, in many cases because it is economically difficult to obtain sufficient amounts of these natural products at reasonable prices. "
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    ABSTRACT: Traditional Asian and African medicine use immature okra fruits (Abelmoschus esculentus) as mucilaginous food to combat gastritis. Its effectiveness is due to polysaccharides that inhibit the adhesion of Helicobacter pylori to stomach tissue. The present study investigates the antiadhesive effect in mechanistic detail. A standardized aqueous fresh extract (Okra FE) from immature okra fruits was used for a quantitative in vitro adhesion assay with FITC-labled H. pylori J99, 2 clinical isolates, AGS cells, and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Bacterial adhesins affected by FE were pinpointed using a dot-blot overlay assay with immobilized Lewis(b), sialyl-Lewis(a), H-1, laminin, and fibronectin. (125)I-radiolabeled Okra FE polymer served for binding studies to different H. pylori strains and interaction experiments with BabA and SabA. Iron nanoparticles with different coatings were used to investigate the influence of the charge-dependence of an interaction on the H. pylori surface. Okra FE dose-dependently (0.2 to 2 mg/mL) inhibited H. pylori binding to AGS cells. FE inhibited the adhesive binding of membrane proteins BabA, SabA, and HpA to its specific ligands. Radiolabeled compounds from FE bound non-specifically to different strains of H. pylori, as well as to BabA/SabA deficient mutants, indicating an interaction with a still-unknown membrane structure in the vicinity of the adhesins. The binding depended on the charge of the inhibitors. Okra FE did not lead to subsequent feedback regulation or increased expression of adhesins or virulence factors. Non-specific interactions between high molecular compounds from okra fruits and the H. pylori surface lead to strong antiadhesive effects.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2014 · PLoS ONE
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