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Why stroke patients don't like Mondays (or Saturdays or Sundays)

Newcastle University, Newcastle-on-Tyne, England, United Kingdom
Age and Ageing (Impact Factor: 3.64). 06/2007; 36(3):242-4. DOI: 10.1093/ageing/afm041
Source: PubMed
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    Preview · Article · Oct 2007 · Age and Ageing
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    ABSTRACT: Prospective data on 614 consecutive stroke admissions was analysed. 262 (43%) were >80 years. 165 (63.5) were female. In the patients >80 years compared to patients <80 years, mortality was higher, 71 (27%/) v 33 (9%) and length of stay was longer (28.2 +/- 32.5 days v 24.4 +/- 27.5 days). More older patients (>80 years) were discharged to extended nursing care, 71 (27%) v 33 (9.3%), whilst less older patients were discharged home, 87 (33%) v 234 (66%). Prior to their stroke 65 (25%) and 39 (15%) of patients >80 years were dependent in activities of daily living or living in extended nursing care respectively, compared to 24 (6.8%) and 15 (4.2%) of patients <80 years. Existing or new onset atrial fibrillation was present in 118 (45%) of patients > or =80 years, compared to 76 (21.5%) in patients <80 years. Stroke in patient's > or =80 years occurs in over 40% of stroke admissions to our hospital and is associated with increased mortality and poor outcome. Stroke services must be developed to optimise stroke prevention and improve the poor outcome in this rapidly increasing population.
    No preview · Article · Jan 2008 · Irish medical journal