Article

Uiberacker, M. et al. Attosecond real-time observation of electron tunnelling in atoms. Nature 446, 627-632

Department für Physik, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität, Am Coulombwall 1, Germany.
Nature (Impact Factor: 41.46). 05/2007; 446(7136):627-32. DOI: 10.1038/nature05648
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Atoms exposed to intense light lose one or more electrons and become ions. In strong fields, the process is predicted to occur via tunnelling through the binding potential that is suppressed by the light field near the peaks of its oscillations. Here we report the real-time observation of this most elementary step in strong-field interactions: light-induced electron tunnelling. The process is found to deplete atomic bound states in sharp steps lasting several hundred attoseconds. This suggests a new technique, attosecond tunnelling, for probing short-lived, transient states of atoms or molecules with high temporal resolution. The utility of attosecond tunnelling is demonstrated by capturing multi-electron excitation (shake-up) and relaxation (cascaded Auger decay) processes with subfemtosecond resolution.

Download full-text

Full-text

Available from: Matthias Lezius
  • Source
    • "Considering He atoms, rotational and bending modes of the two-excited-electron motion preceded the ionization have been identified [44]. Double ionization of Ne atoms has been experimentally studied in [45]. Here, we consider another process in which two electrons are ionized in such a way that their energies are highly correlated. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Two auto-ionization systems in a stationary optical field mutually interacting via the dipole-dipole interaction are considered. Their evolution is analytically found. Joint spectra of two ionized electrons are analyzed in detail in the long-time limit for comparable strengths of direct and indirect ionization paths as well as the dominating indirect ionization path. Entanglement in the state of two ionized electrons is quantified using the density of quadratic negativity. Suitable conditions for obtaining highly entangled states are discussed.
    Full-text · Article · May 2015 · Journal of Physics B Atomic Molecular and Optical Physics
  • Source
    • "The motion of the ions is associated with chemical transformations such as dissociation [4] in the femtosecond domain. The motion of the electrons is associated with electronic rearrangement processes such as charge redistribution [5] [6], localization [7] [8] as well as ionization processes such as tunneling [9] in the attosecond domain. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We show that additional features can emerge in the linear absorption spectra of homonuclear diatomic molecules when the ions are described quantum mechanically. In particular, the widths and energies of the peaks in the optical spectra change with the initial configuration, mass, and charge of the molecule. We intro-duce a model that can describe these features and we provide a quantitative analysis of the resulting peak energy shifts and width broadenings as a function of the mass.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Physical Review A
  • Source
    • "The motion of the ions is associated with chemical transformations such as dissociation [4] in the femtosecond domain. The motion of the electrons is associated with electronic rearrangement processes such as charge redistribution [5] [6], localization [7] [8] as well as ionization processes such as tunneling [9] in the attosecond domain. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We show that additional features can emerge in the linear absorption spectra of homonuclear diatomic molecules when the ions are described quantum mechanically. In particular, the widths and energies of the peaks in the optical spectra change with the initial configuration, mass, and charge of the molecule. We introduce a model that can describe these features and we provide a quantitative analysis of the resulting peak energy shifts and width broadenings as a function of the mass.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
Show more