Article

Joint Proprioception, muscle strength and functional ability in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

VU University Amsterdam, Amsterdamo, North Holland, Netherlands
Arthritis & Rheumatology (Impact Factor: 7.76). 06/2007; 57(5):787-93. DOI: 10.1002/art.22779
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To test the hypotheses that poor knee joint proprioception is related to limitations in functional ability, and poor proprioception aggravates the impact of muscle weakness on limitations in functional ability in osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee.
Sixty-three patients with symptomatic OA of the knee were tested. Proprioceptive acuity was assessed by establishing the joint motion detection threshold (JMDT) in the anteroposterior direction. Muscle strength was measured using a computer-driven isokinetic dynamometer. Functional ability was assessed by the 100-meter walking test, the Get Up and Go (GUG) test, and the Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index physical function (WOMAC-PF) questionnaire. Correlation analyses were performed to assess the relationship between proprioception, muscle strength, and functional ability. Regression analyses were performed to assess the impact of proprioception on the relationship between muscle strength and functional ability.
Poor proprioception (high JMDT) was related to more limitation in functional ability (walking time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; GUG time r = 0.30, P < 0.05; WOMAC-PF r = 0.26, P <0.05). In regression analyses, the interaction between proprioception and muscle strength was significantly related to functional ability (walking time, P < 0.001 and GUG time, P < 0.001) but not to WOMAC-PF score (P = 0.625). In patients with poor proprioception, reduction of muscle strength was associated with more severe deterioration of functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception.
Patients with poor proprioception show more limitation in functional ability, but this relationship is rather weak. In patients with poor proprioception, muscle weakness has a stronger impact on limitations in functional ability than in patients with accurate proprioception.

    • "Proprioceptive accuracy of the knee joint was assessed using a threshold detection test of joint motion (0.3 @BULLET /second) by measuring the difference between actual onset of passive motion and the subject's detection of motion (in degrees)[18]. Visual and auditory stimuli, mechanical vibrations, cutaneous tension and pressure cues were minimised. Each knee was measured three times. "
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    ABSTRACT: Objectives Although exercise therapy is effective for reducing pain and activity limitations in patients with knee osteoarthritis (OA), the underlying mechanisms are unclear. This study aimed to evaluate if improvements in neuromuscular factors (i.e. upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception) underlie the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA. Design Secondary analyses from a randomised controlled trial, with measurements at baseline, 6 weeks, 12 weeks and 38 weeks. Setting Rehabilitation centre. Participants One hundred and fifty-nine patients diagnosed with knee OA. Intervention Exercise therapy. Main outcome measures Changes in pain [numeric rating scale (NRS)] and activity limitations [Western Ontario and McMaster Universities Osteoarthritis Index (WOMAC) physical function subscale and get-up-and-go test] during the study period. Independent variables were changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee joint proprioception (i.e. motion sense) during the study period. Longitudinal regression analyses (generalised estimating equation) were performed to analyse associations between changes in upper leg muscle strength and knee proprioception with changes in pain and activity limitations. Results Improved muscle strength was significantly associated with reductions in NRS pain {B coefficient -2.5 [95% confidence interval (CI) -3.7 to -1.4], meaning that every change of 1 unit of strength was linked to a change of -2.5 units of pain}, WOMAC physical function (- 8.8, 95% CI -13.4 to -4.2) and get-up-and-go test (-1.7, 95% CI -2.4 to -1.0). Improved proprioception was not significantly associated with better outcomes of exercise therapy (P > 0.05). Conclusions Upper leg muscle strengthening is one of the mechanisms underlying the beneficial effects of exercise therapy in patients with knee OA.
    No preview · Article · Aug 2014 · Physiotherapy
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    • "Knee muscle strength was assessed by using an isokinetic dynamometer (EnKnee; Enraf-Nonius, Rotterdam, The Netherlands) at baseline and at 2-year follow-up [23]. An initial practice attempt was used for the patients to get familiar with the required movements. "
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    ABSTRACT: Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the associations of elevated serum C-reactive protein (CRP) and erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) with change in muscle strength in patients with established knee osteoarthritis (OA), at 2 years. Methods Data from 186 patients with knee OA were gathered at baseline and at 2-year follow-up. CRP (in milligrams per liter) and ESR (in millimeters per hour) were measured in serum from patients’ blood. Strength of quadriceps and hamstrings muscles was assessed by using an isokinetic dynamometer. The association of inflammatory markers with change in knee muscle strength was analyzed by using uni- and multi-variate linear regression models. Results Patients with elevated CRP values at both baseline and 2-year follow-up exhibited a lower increase in knee muscle strength for a period of 2 years (β = -0.22; P = 0.01) compared with the group with non-elevated levels at both times of assessment. The association persisted after adjustment for relevant confounders. Elevated ESR values at both times of assessment were not significantly associated with change in knee muscle strength (β = -0.05; P = 0.49). Conclusions Our results indicate that elevated CRP values are related to a lower gain in muscle strength over time in patients with established knee OA. Although the mechanism to explain this relationship is not fully elucidated, these results suggest inflammation as a relevant factor influencing muscle strength in this group of patients.
    Full-text · Article · Jun 2014 · Arthritis Research & Therapy
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    • "Osteoarthritis is the most common type of arthritis that causes disabilities or problems in elderly populations9). Women have a higher incidence of degenerative osteoarthritis than men. "
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    ABSTRACT: [Purpose] This study aimed to identify how treatment with the Mulligan technique of mobilization with movement (MWM) influences pain and physical function of patients with degenerative osteoarthritis. [Subjects] Thirty patients diagnosed with degenerative osteoarthritis were divided into an experimental group (n=15), and a control group (n=15). [Methods] The experimental group was treated with general physical therapy, trunk stabilization exercises, and performed the MWM using the Mulligan technique. The control group was treated with general physical therapy, and then performed trunk stabilization exercises. [Results] Statistically significant differences were found after the intervention in the experimental group in the visual analog scale and Western Ontario and McMaster Universities osteoarthritis index pain, stiffening, and physical function scores. [Conclusion] We consider the treatment of degenerative osteoarthritis patients using the MWM technique is effective for reducing pain and improving physical functions.
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2013 · Journal of Physical Therapy Science
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