Impact Of Pediatricians’ Perceived Self-Efficacy and Confidence on Violence Prevention Counseling: A National Study

Article · February 2008with10 Reads
DOI: 10.1007/s10995-007-0223-2 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
To measure impact of pediatricians' perceived self-efficacy and confidence on current practices and attitudes regarding four violence prevention (VP) topics (gun storage, gun removal, limiting exposure to media violence, discipline techniques) during health supervision for children ages 2-11. Random sample survey of American Academy of Pediatrics Fellows (n = 486; 53% response rate) providing health supervision for children ages 2-11. Participants surveyed about VP issues regarding: (1) current counseling practices for 2-5 and 6-11 year olds; (2) amount of time spent addressing; (3) confidence in addressing; and (4) perceived self-efficacy at changing patients' behaviors. Multivariate analyses explored relationships between pediatricians' perceived self-efficacy and confidence versus VP counseling frequency. VP topics were not routinely discussed during health supervision. Most pediatricians (64%) reported spending too little time addressing these topics. Although most pediatricians felt confident discussing and effective at changing behaviors regarding limiting exposure to media violence (89% vs. 50%) and discipline techniques (91% vs. 76%), they were less so for safe gun storage (54% vs. 35%) and gun removal (51% vs. 17%). Perceived self-efficacy was the mediating factor on self-reported VP counseling frequencies for all topics. Pediatricians reported spending insufficient time on VP counseling. Confidence and perceived self-efficacy levels varied by VP topic, but for all topics pediatricians felt more confident discussing than effective at changing behaviors. Since pediatricians' self-efficacy was related to counseling practices, boosting self-efficacy could ultimately improve counseling frequencies. Further research is needed to identify methods to build providers' perceived self-efficacy regarding these VP areas.
  • ... The prevention of GV in domestic settings has taken several approaches: (1) reducing availability to guns (Hoskin, 2011), especially for seniors (Green, Bornstein & Dietrich, 2007); (2) ensuring safe storage and handling of weapons (Finch, Weiley, Ip & Barkin, 2008; Green, et al., 2007); (3) monitoring and restricting consumption of violent media (Hofmann, 2013); and (4) promoting positive non-violent familial relations and child rearing (Hofmann, 2013). ...
  • ... The prevention of GV in domestic settings has taken several approaches: (1) reducing availability to guns (Hoskin, 2011), especially for seniors (Green, Bornstein & Dietrich, 2007); (2) ensuring safe storage and handling of weapons (Finch, Weiley, Ip & Barkin, 2008; Green, et al., 2007); (3) monitoring and restricting consumption of violent media (Hofmann, 2013); and (4) promoting positive non-violent familial relations and child rearing (Hofmann, 2013). ...
  • ... 13 Families are also eager to receive these services in the health care setting. 11,14 This study focuses on identifying youth who are at risk for perpetrating violence: By providing a tool to assess future violence perpetration HCPs will be able to identify youth at risk, and then link them to effective interventions. There are multiple evidence-based programs that decrease youth violence perpetration: mentoring programs such as Big Brothers 15 ; family-based strategies such as Multisystemic Therapy 16 or Functional Family Therapy 17,18 and group-based counseling (ie, Strengthening Families). ...