Article

Swings and roundabouts: Management of jealousy in heterosexual ‘swinging'couples

Department of Psychology, University of Sussex, Falmer BN1 9QH, UK.
British Journal of Social Psychology (Impact Factor: 1.76). 07/2007; 46(Pt 2):459-76. DOI: 10.1348/014466606X143153
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Swinging involves consensual mutual involvement in extra-dyadic sex. Jealousy in swinging couples is an interesting topic for social psychological research, because it is a common and acceptable response to a romantic partner's real or imagined infidelity. This qualitative study examined the management of jealousy among four active heterosexual swinging couples living in southern England. Participants highlighted the importance of discussion and negotiation to develop a shared couple identity and shared rules and boundaries that allowed them to manage jealousy so that they could better enjoy swinging. Rather than seeking to eliminate jealousy, swingers may manage their feelings of jealousy in order to increase sexual excitement and arousal. This study adds to our understanding of jealousy among swingers and the broader issue of jealousy in intimate relationships.

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    • "These considerations highlight the theoretical and practical importance of expanding our current understanding of CNM relationships relative to monogamous relationships. A number of studies have used qualitative and interviewbased designs to compare monogamous and CNM relationships (Barker, 2005; de Visser & McDonald, 2007; Klesse, 2005, 2006; Pallotta-Chiarolli, 2006; Ritchie & Barker, 2007; Robinson, 2013; Sheff, 2005, 2006; Wosick-Correa, 2010). Fewer studies have systematically compared monogamous and CNM relationships using quantitative analyses. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
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    • "A number of studies have used qualitative and interview-based designs to compare monogamous and CNM relationships (Barker, 2005; de Visser and McDonald, 2007; Klesse, 2005, 2006; Pallotta-Chiarolli, 2006; Ritchie & Barker, 2007; Robinson, 2013; Sheff, 2005, 2006; Wosick-Correa, 2010). Fewer studies have systematically compared monogamous and CNM relationships using quantitative analyses. "
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    ABSTRACT: This study examined the frequency of partner-directed mate retention behaviors and several self- and partner-rated romantic relationship evaluations (i.e., sociosexuality, relationship satisfaction, mate value, and partner ideal measures) within monogamous and consensually non-monogamous (CNM) relationships. Measures were compared (1) between monogamous and CNM participants and (2) between two concurrent partners within each CNM relationship (i.e., primary and secondary partners). We found that individuals in currently monogamous relationships (n = 123) performed more mate retention behaviors compared to those currently in CNM relationships (n = 76). Within CNM relationships, participants reported engaging in more mate retention behaviors with primary partners compared to secondary partners. Likewise, CNM participants reported talking about their extra-dyadic sexual experiences and downplaying these sexual experiences more often with their primary partner compared to their secondary partner. There were no significant differences between ratings of monogamous and primary partners in participants' overall relationship satisfaction. However, monogamous participants reported less satisfaction with the amount of communication and openness they had with their partner compared to CNM participants' reports of their primary partner, but not secondary partner. By comparison, CNM participants reported higher overall relationship satisfaction with primary compared to secondary partners and considered their primary partner to be more desirable as a long-term mate than their secondary partner. We interpret these results within the context of previous research on monogamous and CNM relationships and hypothesize that these relationship configurations are alternative strategies for pursuing a strategically pluralistic mating strategy.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2015 · Archives of Sexual Behavior
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    • "We expect that having experienced past partner infidelity would alter the way that individuals experiences jealousy in their current relationship; therefore, we hypothesize that controlling for past partner infidelity may reveal an effect of the jealousy-provoking vignettes on T. Exclusive sexual access to a partner is important to many people (Sharpsteen and Kirkpatrick 1997), though some (e.g., polyamorous individuals) may feel otherwise. Polyamorous people do feel jealousy, but generally find it more manageable than monoamorous people (de Visser and McDonald 2007). Jealousy, therefore, may be experienced differently by people in monoamorous vs. polyamorous relationships. "
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    ABSTRACT: Jealousy evokes strong psychological responses, but little is known about physiological effects. This study investigated whether actively thinking about a jealousy-provoking situation would result in a testosterone (T) response, and what factors might mediate this effect. We examined T responses to imagining one’s partner engaging in one of three activities: a neutral conversation with a co-worker, a flirtatious conversation with an attractive person, or a passionate kiss with an attractive person. Women in the flirting condition experienced a significantly larger increase in T relative to those in the neutral condition; the kissing condition was intermediate. In men, there were no significant effects of jealousy condition on T. These findings are consistent with the Steroid/Peptide Theory of Social Bonds, such that the flirting condition elicited a ‘competitive’ T response, and the kissing condition elicited responses consistent with defeat.
    Preview · Article · Jun 2015
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