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[New phytotherapical opportunity in the prevention and treatment of 2-type of diabetes mellitus]

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Abstract

The authors report their preclinical and clinical test results of an infusion (Diabole) made of dill (Anethum graveolens), nettle (Urtica dioica) and gingko (Gingko biloba) herbal mixture and accordingly, this preparation given in right dosages could be suitable for reducing blood sugar level significantly in II. type of diabetes mellitus.

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... Reports on the effects of nettle in animal models of diabetes have been inconsistent [12]. Nevertheless, an infusion of a mixture consisting of three herbs including nettle and also a mixture of dry leaf extracts of four herbs including nettle had anti-hyperglycemic effects in patients with T2DM [13,14]. However, there is no clinical trial reporting the effects of nettle leaves as a single component herbal medicine in the treatment of type 2 diabetic patients. ...
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Advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) needing insulin therapy is common. Most conventional anti-hyperglycemic drugs have limited efficacies and significant side effects, so that better anti-hyperglycemic agents are needed. Urtica dioica L. (nettle) leaves have insulin secretagogue, PPARgamma agonistic, and alpha-glucosidase inhibitory effects. Moreover, nettle leaves are used in traditional medicine as an anti-hyperglycemic agent to treat diabetes mellitus. Thus, efficacy and safety of nettle in the treatment of patients with advanced type 2 diabetes mellitus needing insulin were studied. In this randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial, we evaluated the effects of taking nettle leaf extract (one 500 mg capsule every 8 hours for 3 months) combined with the conventional oral anti-hyperglycemic drugs on the blood levels of fasting glucose, postprandial glucose, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), creatinine and liver enzymes SGOT and SGPT, and systolic and diastolic blood pressures in 46 patients and compared with the placebo group (n = 46). At the endpoint, the extract lowered the blood levels of fasting glucose, 2 hours postprandial glucose, and HbA1c significantly (p < 0.001, p = 0.009, and p = 0.006, respectively) without any significant effects on the other parameters (p > 0.05) compared with placebo. Nettle may safely improve glycemic control in type 2 diabetic patients needing insulin therapy.
... Although there is a paucity of animal studies on the contribution of A. graveolens in the treatment of hyperlipidemic and hypercholesterolemic conditions (Kojuri et al., 2007), HCl-induced gastric lesions (Hosseinzadeh et al., 2002), regulation of corticosteroid-induced type 2 diabetes mellitus (Panda, 2008), prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes mellitus (Fodor and Keve, 2006), regulatory properties of the menstrual cycle and antifertility effects (Monsefi et al., 2006) the safety profile of this traditional remedy has not been clarified yet. According to the EMEA 2006 guideline (EMEA Guideline 2006) for many herbal preparations contained in wellestablished or traditional herbal medicinal products an adequate safety profile, may be confirmed by their long-term medicinal and/or food use. ...
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Anethum graveolens L. (dill) is used widely in Asian food and folk medicine but its safety profile for further clinical studies has remained unclear. After administration of total hydroalcoholic extract to mice in acute, subacute and sub-chronic treatment periods, toxic responses were recoreded by clinical, biochemical, hematological and pathological examinations. Doses up to 2000 mg/kg in acute study did not cause any mortality and doses up to 1000 mg/kg didn't cause any toxic effect in subacute study. Following to daily administration of doses of 1000 mg/kg/day as Maximum Tolerated Dose (MTD) and doses of 50 (1/20 MTD), 500 (1/2MTD) and 1000 mg/kg (MTD) in 45 days regimen, signif cant falls in white cell counts was reported after 3 weeks (P-value < 0.05) in high (P-value = 0.042) and intermediate dose (P-value = 0.018) groups of male animals. Dill extract caused significant reduction of FBS in high dose female animal group (P-value = 0.021). Portal mononuclear lymphoid and PMN leucocytes infiltration in three adjacent foci were seen in intermediate and high dose groups of both sexes which was clearly a dose dependent effect. Doses less than 50 mg/kg could be consi ered as safe dose in both genders of mice with the good potential for further antihypoglycemic or antihyperlipidemic clinical studies.
... Both the herb and fruits are used for the extraction of volatile oil and in food preparations. Dill herb is reported to possess antidiabetic, antihyperlipidaemic and antihypercholesterolemic activities [2][3][4] . Anethoferon, carvone and limonene as potential cancer preventive agents were isolated from the dill oil and with maturity of the herb, carvone content of the oil increases and phellandrene and d-limonene contents decreases 5 . ...
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The study was conducted to compare in vitro antioxidant activities of ethanol extracts of edible and non-edible leaves of Anethum graveolens Linn. The antioxidant activity was evaluated using nine different standard methods. The green leaves extract exhibited high percentage of inhibition in most of the methods, when compared to the non-edible yellow leaves extract. The HPTLC of the yellow leaves extract exhibited six compounds instead of four observed for green leaves extract transformation towards inactive compounds. The total phenol content of the yellow leaves extract was found to be high, indicating there was no relationship between the activity and the total phenol content. The study supports the traditional use of green leaves as vegetable and food flavouring agent.
... Three studies have tested the anti-diabetic effect of the extract of Ginkgo biloba (EGb). It was believed that the EGb could repair and protect islet cell, reduce blood glucose, increase insulin serection, as well as to adjust blood lipids metabolism [139][140][141]. ...
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Anethum graveolens L., Dill, und seine Unterarten werden seit Jahrhunderten in der traditionellen Heilkunde Asiens und Europas genutzt. Hauptanwendungsgebiete waren v. a. Erkrankungen des Verdauungs- und Harntrakts, wobei diese Indikationen auch heute noch in der Volksheilkunde eine Rolle spielen. Trotz der nachgewiesenen Wirkungen und Wirksamkeit spielt der Dill mit seinen verschiedenen Drogen heute nur noch eine untergeordnete Rolle in der Phytotherapie. Dill und daraus hergestellte Extrakte bzw. das ätherische Öl werden v. a. in der Lebensmittelindustrie als Gewürze und in der Kosmetik eingesetzt. Der vorliegende Artikel gibt einen Einblick in die historische Verwendung des Dills sowie einen Überblick zu phytochemischen und toxikologischen Eigenschaften dieser alten Arzneipflanze. Summary Anethum graveolens L., dill Anethum graveolens L., dill, and its two main subspecies were used as herbal remedies in Asian and European traditional medicine for many centuries. Among other indications, the use focuses on treatment of intestinal and urinary disorders. Despite the scientific evidence for its pharmacological activity the therapeutic significance of dill is rather low. The plant and its extracts, e.g. essential oils are used in the food industry as a spice as well as in the cosmetics industry. The article provides an insight into the historical use and the current state of phytochemical and toxicological properties of A. graveolens.
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Urtica Dioica (UD) is a plant shown to reduce blood glucose levels upon oral ingestion; however, neither its active component nor its mechanism of action has been identified. One active fraction of this extract, termed UD-1, was separated by molecular sieve column chromatography and purified by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). While UD-1 did not stimulate insulin secretion in glucose-responsive MIN6 clonal beta-cells, chronic exposure (24 h) significantly enhanced glucose uptake (approximately 1.5-fold) in L6-GLUT4myc myoblast cells. Using HPLC and MALDI-TOF, we further purified the UD-1 fraction into two fractions termed UD-1A and UD-1B. Computational and structural analyses strongly suggested that the antidiabetic component of UD-1 was due to one or more structurally related cyclical peptides that facilitate glucose uptake by forming unique glucose permeable pores. The structure and function of these glucose-conducting pores are discussed herein.
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