Article

Effects of dietary supplements on depressive symptoms in older patients: A randomised double-blind placebo-controlled trial

Internal Medicine, Faculty of Medicine & Health Sciences, United Arab Emirate University, UAE.
Clinical Nutrition (Impact Factor: 4.48). 10/2007; 26(5):545-51. DOI: 10.1016/j.clnu.2007.06.007
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The effect of nutritional supplements on mental health in older patients has received little attention so far. The aims of this trial were therefore to test the effect of nutritional support on older patient's depressive symptoms and cognitive function.
In this prospective, double-blind, placebo-controlled study, we randomly assigned 225 hospitalised acutely ill older patients to receive either normal hospital diet plus 400 mL oral nutritional supplements (106 subjects) or normal hospital diet plus a placebo (119 subjects) daily for 6 weeks. The composition of the supplement was such as to provide 995 kcal for energy and 100% of the Reference Nutrient Intakes for a healthy old person for vitamins and minerals. Outcome measures were 6 weeks and 6 months changes in nutritional status, depressive symptoms and cognitive state.
Randomisation to the supplement group led to a significant increase in red-cell folate and plasma vitamin B12 concentrations, in contrast to a decrease seen in the placebo group. There were significant differences in symptoms of depression scores in the supplement group compared with the placebo group at 6 months (p = 0.021 for between groups difference). The effect of supplement was seen in all patient groups including those with no symptoms of depression, mild depression and those with severe depression (p = 0.007). There was no evidence of a difference in cognitive function scores at 6 months.
Oral nutritional supplementation of hospitalised acutely ill older patients led to a statistically significant benefit on depressive symptoms.

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    • "Given the importance of adequate vitamin intakes and the problems achieving them from the diet alone, specific fortified foods and supplements targeted at the elderly, both healthy and frail, need to be developed and tested. It has been shown that the addition of an oral nutrient supplement containing vitamins and additional energy to the diet of acutely ill elderly patients led to an increase in nutritional status [64] and quality of life [65] combined with a decrease in hospital re-admission [66] and depressive symptoms [67] . Given the complexity of the physiological and metabolic changes inherent to the aging process, more research is warranted to gain a better understanding of the effects of vitamin inadequacies on aging and the capacity of nutritional interventions to slow this process. "

    Preview · Article · Jan 2016
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    • "For example, in an RCT with 73 nursing home residents, use of micronutrients was shown to assist with mood in those residents with low levels of selenium (Gosney, Hammond, Shenkin, & Allsup, 2008). In an RCT of a complex micronutrient formula in 225 hospitalized older patients suffering from a variety of acute illnesses, patients who received the active version displayed fewer signs of depression than did those who received a placebo, even if they had not been clinically depressed (Gariballa & Forster, 2007). In other words, there was evidence of improved mood in everyone receiving the micronutrients—individuals with severe or mild depression, as well as those not previously reporting low mood. "
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    ABSTRACT: We live in a transformational moment for understanding the etiology of mental disorders. The previous leap in understanding occurred 60 years ago, which led us to incorporate psychopharmacology into our curricula to address the chemical basis of neurotransmitter function, especially as explained through the then-popular catecholamine hypothesis. The current revolution is broader, consisting of the rapidly accumulating knowledge of how inflammation, microbiome imbalance (gut dysbiosis), oxidative stress, and impaired mitochondrial output affect brain function. Suitable interventions for fighting inflammation, restoring normal gut function, reducing oxidative stress, and improving mitochondrial metabolism incorporate lifestyle variables, including nutrients and probiotics. This article invites readers to stay abreast of this emerging model of the biological basis of mental illness, given that it has particular relevance for those readers interested in alleviating the suffering of individuals with mental disorders. This overview describes the basis for a new field in mental health: nutritional psychiatry/psychology.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2015
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    • "For example, in an RCT with 73 nursing home residents, use of micronutrients was shown to assist with mood in those residents with low levels of selenium (Gosney, Hammond, Shenkin, & Allsup, 2008). In an RCT of a complex micronutrient formula in 225 hospitalized older patients suffering from a variety of acute illnesses, patients who received the active version displayed fewer signs of depression than did those who received a placebo, even if they had not been clinically depressed (Gariballa & Forster, 2007). In other words, there was evidence of improved mood in everyone receiving the micronutrients—individuals with severe or mild depression, as well as those not previously reporting low mood. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: We live in a transformational moment for understanding the etiology of mental disorders. The previous leap in understanding occurred 60 years ago, which led us to incorporate psychopharmacology into our curricula to address the chemical basis of neurotransmitter function, especially as explained through the then-popular catecholamine hypothesis. The current revolution is broader, consisting of the rapidly accumulating knowledge of how inflammation, microbiome imbalance (gut dysbiosis), oxidative stress, and impaired mitochondrial output affect brain function. Suitable interventions for fighting inflammation, restoring normal gut function, reducing oxidative stress, and improving mitochondrial metabolism incorporate lifestyle variables, including nutrients and probiotics. This article invites readers to stay abreast of this emerging model of the biological basis of mental illness, given that it has particular relevance for those readers interested in alleviating the suffering of individuals with mental disorders. This overview describes the basis for a new field in mental health: nutritional psychiatry/psychology.
    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Clinical Psychological Science
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