Article

A comprehensive evaluation of the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome(R) system for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy and selective excision of breast lesions

Division of Surgical Oncology, Department of Surgery, Arthur G, James Cancer Hospital and Richard J, Solove Research Institute and Comprehensive Cancer Center, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio, 43210, USA. .
World Journal of Surgical Oncology (Impact Factor: 1.41). 02/2007; 5(1):83. DOI: 10.1186/1477-7819-5-83
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Minimally invasive breast biopsy technology is now considered a standard of care for the diagnostic evaluation of suspicious breast lesions. The aim of the current study was to present a comprehensive evaluation of the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome(R) system for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy and selective excision of breast lesions.
A retrospective analysis was conducted of a series of 304 consecutive 8-gauge Mammotome(R) procedures that were performed under ultrasound guidance by a single surgeon from March 2004 to December 2006. Multiple variables, including patient demographics, characteristics of the breast lesion (based on ultrasound and mammography), procedural and histopathology variables, and interval follow-up variables (based on ultrasound and mammography), were evaluated.
Among 304 procedures, 235 (77%) were performed with the presumption of complete excision of the ultrasound lesion during Mammotome(R) core acquisition, while 69 (23%) were performed with only partial excision of the ultrasound lesion during Mammotome(R) core acquisition (diagnostic tissue sampling only). 100% of all ultrasound lesions were accurately diagnosed, demonstrating no apparent false-negative results among the 256 patients that were compliant with follow-up at a median interval follow-up duration of 11 months (range 1 to 37). Likewise, 89% of all appropriately selected ultrasound lesions were completely excised, as demonstrated on interval follow-up ultrasound at a median time of 6 months (range, 3 to 16). There were no independent predictors of successful complete excision of any given appropriately selected ultrasound lesion by the ultrasound-guided 8-gauge Mammotome(R) biopsy technique.
The 8-gauge vacuum-assisted Mammotome(R) system is highly accurate for ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy of suspicious breast lesions and is highly successful for complete excision of appropriately selected presumed benign breast lesions. This particular technology should be routinely offered to all appropriately selected patients that are evaluated by physicians involved in breast-specific health care.

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Available from: Rafael E Jimenez, Nov 20, 2014
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    • "Through the use of the Mammotome biopsy system, complete excisions have been achieved and the therapeutic management of benign breast diseases has developed incidentally (23). Increasing numbers of surgeons have attempted similar therapeutic procedures (21,27,28,30–32). The application of an 8-gauge probe led to the possibility of larger-volume sampling and excision (31). "
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    • "Vacuum-assisted core biopsy was first performed on the 5th of August, 1995 in Denver, USA. Since 1996 it has been used in Europe and since 1999 in Poland [1]. Mammotome biopsy can be performed under the guidance of ultrasound or mammography (stereotaxic biopsy), and recently also under MR guidance [2]. "
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    • "After local anesthetic was administered, a #11 blade was used to make an approximately 5 mm skin incision entrance site for the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy procedures and an approximately 2 mm skin incision entrance site for the spring-loaded 14-gauge core biopsy procedures. Further details with regard to the specific techniques used during the 8-gauge vacuum-assisted biopsy procedures have been previously reported [8,40]. After the completion of core acquisition and after the removal of ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy device from the breast, a 14-gauge Cormark™ rigid microclip device (Devicor Medical Products, Inc., Cincinnati, Ohio) was inserted under ultrasound guidance through the same breast parenchymal track for placement of a microclip into the area of the ultrasound-guided diagnostic biopsy. "
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    Full-text · Article · Aug 2011 · World Journal of Surgical Oncology
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