Article

Cortisol determination in hair and faeces from domestic cats and dogs. Gen Comp Endocrinol

Dipartimento di Morfofisiologia Veterinaria e Produzioni Animali (DIMORFIPA), Università degli Studi di Bologna, Via Tolara di Sopra 50, 40064 Ozzano Emilia (BO), Italy.
General and Comparative Endocrinology (Impact Factor: 2.47). 02/2008; 155(2):398-402. DOI: 10.1016/j.ygcen.2007.07.002
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The present study explored the feasibility of a hair cortisol assay in domestic cats (Felis silvestris catus) and dogs (Canis familiaris) as a valid and reliable alternative to existing non-invasive techniques for monitoring the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. To this aim, 56 new hair growth samples and 870 faecal samples from 27 domestic cats and 29 domestic dogs were collected and cortisol content was assessed. A significant positive association was observed in both species between the concentrations of cortisol determined in hair and faeces. This finding is discussed in the light of the existing knowledge of hair physiology and in the perspective of its application to studies on chronic stress.

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    • "Hair cortisol analysis is increasingly applied in various circumstances , including clinical diagnosis in livestock (Comin et al., 2013), behavioral science (Dettmer et al., 2014), captive management (e.g., Carlitz et al., 2014), and conservation (e.g., Bryan et al., 2013). Furthermore, hair cortisol analysis has been applied in a growing number of mammalian species, including humans (review: Staufenbiel et al., 2013), non-human primates (e.g., Carlitz et al., 2014; Davenport et al., 2008, 2006; Dettmer et al., 2014; Fourie and Bernstein, 2011; Yamanashi et al., 2013), bears (e.g., Bechshøft et al., 2012, 2011; Macbeth et al., 2012, 2010; Malcolm et al., 2013), cows (Moya et al., 2013), horses (Anielski, 2008), dogs (Accorsi et al., 2008; Bennett and Hayssen, 2010), rock hyraxes (Koren et al., 2008), lynx (Terwissen et al., 2013), and chipmunks (Martin and Réale, 2008; Mastromonaco et al., 2014). Despite the increased application of HCC analysis, the indicator value of HCC would be greatly improved if we knew which other factors than long-term stress affect the incorporation of and retention of cortisol in hair. "

    Full-text · Dataset · Dec 2015
    • "This is even more the case for hair samples, which provide an average measurement over a period of weeks. This relatively novel method has recently been validated for long-term cortisol assessment in dogs, though effects of hair color should be taken into account (Accorsi et al., 2008; Bennett and Hayssen, 2010; Bryan et al., 2013). Saliva sampling is another noninvasive method. "
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    ABSTRACT: Saliva sampling is an easy, noninvasive method to assess short-term physiological changes, and as such is a valuable addition to behavioral studies in dogs. Different methods for collecting saliva samples in dogs have been reported in literature, and there appears to be no "standard operating procedure" that suits the needs of all studies. Hence, this review provides a clear overview of "considerations" to take into account when selecting the most appropriate saliva sampling procedure. Different collection devices, procedures, and practical considerations are discussed in light of available literature and the authors' practical experience, to guide researchers in this selection process. Additional factors that might influence the (interpretation of the) results are also discussed, so that these can be taken into account for optimization of the research protocol. This guidance should facilitate the initial selection of the most appropriate procedure, but each researcher is strongly recommended to conduct preliminary tests to detect and prevent possible biases or practical issues beforehand. Standardization is key to obtain reliable results that can be compared to other studies.
    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Behavior Clinical Applications and Research
    • "This is even more the case for hair samples, which provide an average measurement over a period of weeks. This relatively novel method has recently been validated for long-term cortisol assessment in dogs, though effects of hair color should be taken into account (Accorsi et al., 2008; Bennett and Hayssen, 2010; Bryan et al., 2013). Saliva sampling is another noninvasive method. "

    No preview · Article · Sep 2015 · Journal of Veterinary Behavior Clinical Applications and Research
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