Article

Evidence of slow maturation of the superior longitudinal fasciculus in early childhood by diffusion tensor imaging. NeuroImage, 38, 239-247

Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
NeuroImage (Impact Factor: 6.36). 12/2007; 38(2):239-47. DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2007.07.033
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

While the majority of axonal organization is established by birth in mammalian brains, axonal wiring and pruning processes, as well as myelination, are known to extend to the postnatal periods, where environmental stimuli often play a major role. Normal axonal and myelin development of individual white matter tracts of human in this period is poorly understood and may have a major role in cognitive development of human. In this study, we applied diffusion tensor imaging and normalization-based population analyses to 44 preteen children and 30 adult images. We observed highly significant changes of fiber orientations at regions that correspond to the superior longitudinal fasciculus during the first 5 years. The result is attributed to slow axonal and/or myelin maturation of this tract, which is believed to be involved in language functions.

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    • "One solution is to incorporate DTI to guide the transformation (Ceritoglu et al., 2009; Oishi et al., 2009; Studholme, 2008). DTI is capable of depicting wellaligned structures, such as axonal bundles, and hence provides rich contrast within the white matter, even for the neonatal brain with less myelination (Fig. 1); in fact, most of the white matter structures seen in the adult brain with DTI have already been established in the neonatal brain and can be visualized by DTI (Huang et al., 2006; Zhang et al., 2007). This motivated us to create co-registered MRI-and DTI-based, age-specific atlases, with parcellation maps, for the pediatric population (Fig. 2). "

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2014
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    • "One solution is to incorporate DTI to guide the transformation (Ceritoglu et al., 2009; Oishi et al., 2009; Studholme, 2008). DTI is capable of depicting wellaligned structures, such as axonal bundles, and hence provides rich contrast within the white matter, even for the neonatal brain with less myelination (Fig. 1); in fact, most of the white matter structures seen in the adult brain with DTI have already been established in the neonatal brain and can be visualized by DTI (Huang et al., 2006; Zhang et al., 2007). This motivated us to create co-registered MRI-and DTI-based, age-specific atlases, with parcellation maps, for the pediatric population (Fig. 2). "
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    • "May 2011 | Volume 2 | Article 93 | 11 temporal/temporoparietal region has been reported in primate studies (Petrides and Pandya, 1988; Romanski et al., 1999) and in human studies using DTI (Makris et al., 2005; Tomassini et al., 2007). In the infants, a small tract of the superior longitudinal fasciculus and the arcuate fasciculus connecting these regions was identified and reconstructed by tractography of DTI (Zhang et al., 2007; Dubois et al., 2009). These studies suggest that these anatomical connections , at least partly, exist in infancy. "
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