Article

Using the RE-AIM Framework to Evaluate a Physical Activity Intervention in Churches

Department of Kinesiology, 1A Natatorium, Kansas State University, Manhattan, KS 66506, USA.
Preventing chronic disease (Impact Factor: 2.12). 11/2007; 4(4):A87.
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Health-e-AME was a 3-year intervention designed to promote physical activity at African Methodist Episcopal churches across South Carolina. It is based on a community-participation model designed to disseminate interventions through trained volunteer health directors.
We used the RE-AIM (Reach, Effectiveness, Adoption, Implementation, and Maintenance) framework to evaluate this intervention through interviews with 50 health directors.
Eighty percent of the churches that had a health director trained during the first year of the intervention and 52% of churches that had a health director trained during the second year adopted at least one component of the intervention. Lack of motivation or commitment from the congregation was the most common barrier to adoption. Intervention activities reached middle-aged women mainly. The intervention was moderately well implemented, and adherence to its principles was adequate. Maintenance analyses showed that individual participants in the intervention's physical activity components continued their participation as long as the church offered them, but churches had difficulties continuing to offer physical activity sessions. The effectiveness analysis showed that the intervention produced promising, but not significant, trends in levels of physical activity.
Our use of the RE-AIM framework to evaluate this intervention serves as a model for a comprehensive evaluation of the health effects of community programs to promote health.

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    • "In addition to attending for religious purposes, KAs also prefer to receive health-related information in a church setting (Bastani, Glenn, Maxwell, & Jo, 2007; Jo, Maxwell, Yang, & Bastani, 2009). Accordingly, several studies have utilized Korean churches as the main platform for promoting health and screening for various chronic illnesses (Baruth, Wilcox, Laken, Bopp, & Saunders, 2008; Bopp et al., 2007; Jo et al., 2009). A model of mental health service delivery for KAs, with Korean churches as the central platform for screening of KAs with mental disorders, had been proposed (Lee, Hanner, Cho, Han, & Kim, 2008). "
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    ABSTRACT: Background: Korean Americans (KA) comprise the fourth largest Asian-American subgroup, with a population estimated at nearly 1.7 million, and the vast majority (up to 85%) of KA elders attends ethnic churches. Despite the rapid increase of the KA elderly population, data on mental health service utilization among KA elders are scarce. Method: Based on a cluster sampling method, the Memory and Aging Study among Koreans in Maryland (MASK-MD) recruited and assessed 630 KA elders (mean age: 70.9 ± 6.1 years; 68.9% female) in KA churches for depression, dementia, and level of mental health service utilization. The Korean versions of the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9K) and Mini-mental Status Examination (MMSE-KC) were administered by trained community health workers. Results: Of the 630 participants, 23.2% and 7.3% had PHQ-9 scores of 5 ('mild depression') or above and 10 or above ('clinical depression'), respectively. In addition, 7.0% scored below the age- and education-specific cutoff values for probable dementia based on the MMSE-KC. Of the 92 participants with 'clinical depression' or having thoughts of death or self-injury, only 16 (17%) reported utilizing mental health services. Likewise, of 56 participants with probable dementia, only 3 (7.3%) sought treatment from a health care provider. Conclusion: The prevalence of depression and cognitive impairment are high in community-dwelling KA elders attending KA churches, but the rate of mental health service utilization among depressed or cognitively impaired Korean elders is low. Further research is warranted to identify barriers to and strategies for adequate mental health care for Korean immigrant elders.
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    • "Future research should consider online websites for the delivery of faith-based health education pamphlets and training materials to increase proficiency in health-related individual/small-group counseling. Many studies have noted the importance of involving the key faith leader for program success (Bopp et al., 2007; Campbell et al., 2007; DeHaven et al., 2004; Demark-Wahnefried et al., 2000; Peterson et al., 2002). Our results corroborate these findings such that faith leader involvement was minimal in most HWA activities . "

    Full-text · Dataset · Oct 2012
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    • "Future research should consider online websites for the delivery of faith-based health education pamphlets and training materials to increase proficiency in health-related individual/small-group counseling. Many studies have noted the importance of involving the key faith leader for program success (Bopp et al., 2007; Campbell et al., 2007; DeHaven et al., 2004; Demark-Wahnefried et al., 2000; Peterson et al., 2002). Our results corroborate these findings such that faith leader involvement was minimal in most HWA activities . "
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