Two-year prospective longitudinal study exploring the factors associated with change in femoral cartilage volume in a cohort largely without knee radiographic osteoarthritis 1

ArticleinOsteoarthritis and Cartilage 16(4):443-9 · April 2008with11 Reads
DOI: 10.1016/j.joca.2007.08.009 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
To identify factors associated with change in femoral cartilage volume over 2 years in a cohort largely without knee radiographic osteoarthritis. A total of 252 subjects (mean 45 years, range 28-60) were used for this study. T1-weighted fat saturation magnetic resonance imaging was performed at baseline and approximately 2 years later. Knee femoral condyle cartilage volume, femoral cartilage defect (0-4 scale) and tibial bone size were determined. The total femoral cartilage volume loss was 6.3% for the 2.3-year period. Factors associated with this annual change were female gender (females vs males: -1.69%, P<0.01), age (over vs under 40 years: -0.96%, P=0.01), smoking (beta: -0.04% per pack-years, P<0.01), as well as lower limb muscle strength (r: +0.32, P<0.01) and its change (beta: +0.34% per quartile, P<0.05). Structural factors associated with change included baseline femoral cartilage volume (beta: -0.36% per ml, P<0.01), femoral cartilage defects (beta: +1.07% per grade, P<0.01), tibial bone area (beta: +0.13% per cm(2), P<0.05), lateral osteophytes (beta: -1.91% per grade, P<0.01) and change in femoral cartilage defects (beta: -0.8% per grade, P<0.001). This study provides evidence confirming that significant risk factors are associated with femoral cartilage loss and these include gender (female), age, smoking, and severity of lower limb muscle weakness. It also supports the hypothesis that femoral cartilage swelling reflected by an increased baseline cartilage volume could be a predictor of disease progression. Our findings also provide interesting clues to implement preventive measures that can possibly prevent or reduce knee cartilage loss.
    • "Linear regression analysis was used to examine the association between baseline radiographic structures/cartilage and cartilage volume loss (absolute and percentage) over 10 years. β-coefficients were standardised to describe the association between baseline radiographic structures/cartilage volume and cartilage volume loss, so that cartilage volume loss was expressed as loss per standard deviation change in the predictor variables [21, 24, 25] . Multivariable analysis was adjusted for age, sex, BMI, offspringcontrol status, radiographic structures/cartilage volume at baseline and MRI structures which had a higher prevalence (or showed a similar trend) in participants with greater than or equal to mean total cartilage volume loss. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Background The aim of this study was to examine whether cartilage volume as measured by MRI and radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) at baseline predict cartilage volume loss over ten years independent of each other and other structural co-pathologies. Methods 219 participants [mean-age 45(26–61); 57 % female] were studied at baseline and ten years. Approximately half were the adult offspring of subjects who underwent knee replacement for OA and the remainder were randomly selected controls. Joint space narrowing (JSN) and osteophytes were assessed on radiographs and cartilage volume (tibiofemoral), cartilage defects, bone marrow lesions and meniscal tears/extrusion were assessed on MRI. Results Mean absolute and percentage per annum cartilage volume loss was 1284 mm³ and 1.91 % respectively in the medial compartment and 1007 mm³ and 1.38 % respectively in the lateral compartment. Higher baseline tibiofemoral cartilage volume was independently associated with greater absolute cartilage volume loss in both medial (β(95 % CI) = −300 (−399,−200)) and lateral (β = −338 (−443,−233)) compartments and percentage per annum loss in the lateral compartment(β = −0.15 (−0.29, −0.01)). Baseline JSN and osteophytes were associated with cartilage volume loss in the univariable analysis, however these associations did not persist after adjustment for other structural co-pathologies. Conclusion Cross-sectional cartilage volume measurement independently predicts cartilage volume loss over 10 years and can be used to identify fast progressors in clinical trials. Radiographic JSN and osteophytes on the other hand are a reflection of other co-pathologies assessed on MRI and do not independently predict cartilage volume loss over 10 years.
    Full-text · Article · Dec 2016
    • "MRI (eight cohort, seven cross-sectional, four case–control studies): in prospective cohorts with high quality welladjusted analyses, greater baseline tibial plateau bone area conferred greater odds of structural progression of OA and incidence of TKR [18, 20, 111, 112]. The same association was observed in a lower quality, prospectivecohort , well-adjusted analysis [113] and in a study of the knee in patients who predominantly had no radiographic evidence of knee OA [18]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. Methods: A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. Results: In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Conclusion: Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. Systematic review: PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009
    Article · Aug 2015 · Arthritis research & therapy
    • "MRI (eight cohort, seven cross-sectional, four case–control studies): in prospective cohorts with high quality welladjusted analyses, greater baseline tibial plateau bone area conferred greater odds of structural progression of OA and incidence of TKR [18, 20, 111, 112]. The same association was observed in a lower quality, prospectivecohort , well-adjusted analysis [113] and in a study of the knee in patients who predominantly had no radiographic evidence of knee OA [18]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract] ABSTRACT: Bone is an integral part of the osteoarthritis (OA) process. We conducted a systematic literature review in order to understand the relationship between non-conventional radiographic imaging of subchondral bone, pain, structural pathology and joint replacement in peripheral joint OA. A search of the Medline, EMBASE and Cochrane library databases was performed for original articles reporting association between non-conventional radiographic imaging-assessed subchondral bone pathologies and joint replacement, pain or structural progression in knee, hip, hand, ankle and foot OA. Each association was qualitatively characterised by a synthesis of the data from each analysis based upon study design, adequacy of covariate adjustment and quality scoring. In total 2456 abstracts were screened and 139 papers were included (70 cross-sectional, 71 longitudinal analyses; 116 knee, 15 hip, six hand, two ankle and involved 113 MRI, eight DXA, four CT, eight scintigraphic and eight 2D shape analyses). BMLs, osteophytes and bone shape were independently associated with structural progression or joint replacement. BMLs and bone shape were independently associated with longitudinal change in pain and incident frequent knee pain respectively. Subchondral bone features have independent associations with structural progression, pain and joint replacement in peripheral OA in the hip and hand but especially in the knee. For peripheral OA sites other than the knee, there are fewer associations and independent associations of bone pathologies with these important OA outcomes which may reflect fewer studies; for example the foot and ankle were poorly studied. Subchondral OA bone appears to be a relevant therapeutic target. PROSPERO registration number: CRD 42013005009.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015
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