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Outcomes of a mind-body treatment program for chronic back pain with no distinct structural pathology - A case series of patients diagnosed and treated as tension myositis syndrome

Authors:
  • Choju Medical Institute

Abstract

Chronic, nonspecific back pain is a ubiquitous problem that has frustrated both physicians and patients. Some have suggested that it is time for a "paradigm shift" in treating it. One of them is John Sarno, MD, of New York University's Rusk Institute of Rehabilitation, who has argued for this in 4 books and several journal publications. We believe that a mind-body approach is more effective and involves much less risk and expense than conventional approaches in appropriately diagnosed cases. To determine if a mind-body treatment program addressing a presumed psychological etiology of persistent back pain merits further research. Case series outcome study. Single physician's office in metropolitan Los Angeles. Fifty-one patients with chronic back pain, diagnosed with tension myositis syndrome, a diagnosis for "functional" back pain and treated in the principal investigator's office in 2002 and 2003. A program of office visits, written educational materials, a structured workbook (guided journal), educational audio CDs, and, in some cases, individual psychotherapy. Pain intensity (visual analog scale scores), quality of life (RAND SF-12), medication usage, and activity level (questionnaires). Follow-up was at least 3 to 12 months after treatment. Mean VAS scores decreased 52% for "average" pain (P < .0001), 35% for "worst" pain (P < .0001), and 65% for "least" pain (P < .0001). SF-12 Physical Health scores rose >9 units (P = .005). Medication usage decreased (P = .0008). Activity levels increased (P =.03). Participants aged >47 years and in pain for >3 years benefited most.
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OUTCOMES OF A MIND-BODY TREATMENT PROGRAM FOR CHRONIC BACK PAIN WITH NO DISTI...
David Schechter; Arthur Preston Smith; Jennifer Beck; Janine Roach; et al
Alternative Therapies in Health and Medicine; Sep/Oct 2007; 13, 5; Health Module
pg. 26
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
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