Article

Prevalence and magnitude of body weight and shape dissatisfaction among university students

Division of Nutritional Sciences, Cornell University, 351A Martha Van Rensselaer Hall, Ithaca, New York 14853, United States.
Eating Behaviors (Impact Factor: 1.58). 01/2008; 8(4):429-39. DOI: 10.1016/j.eatbeh.2007.03.003
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

Although prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing, prevailing sociocultural influences lead females to desire a thin body and males a muscular body, often resulting in body dissatisfaction (BD) because many cannot achieve the cultural ideal. This study examined the magnitude of BD in university undergraduates (n=310). Body weight dissatisfaction (BWD) was measured as the difference between current and idealized body weight; body shape dissatisfaction (BSD) as the difference between and current and idealized body shape. Overall, females expressed greater BD than males. Overweight individuals expressed the greatest BWD and BSD, yet half desired a weight that would maintain their overweight body mass index (BMI) classification. Normal weight females desired a slightly thinner, lighter body, while desires among normal weight males were mixed. Underweight females and normal weight males expressed little BWD and BSD, commonly idealizing a body weight maintaining their BMI classification. However, results may suggest a shift in body size ideals in an era of prevalent obesity, with overweight males and females expressing less BD and few normal weight individuals, particularly females, idealizing a very thin body.

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    • "Although social media encompasses a variety of different platforms (Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, etc.), Facebook is currently the most popular social media platform in the world [8] [9] and has therefore been the primary focus in body image research. In addition, given that body image concerns are particularly salient among young women [10] [11] [12] [13], this demographic has been the focus of much of the research on social media and body image. Finally, the concept of " body image " has been defined a number of different ways in the literature, including body dissatisfaction, drive for thinness/muscularity, and self-objectification, and each of these constructs will be included in the review (for a review of the research on social media and eating disorders, see Keel, this issue). "
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    ABSTRACT: This paper provides an overview of research on social media and body image. Correlational studies consistently show that social media usage (particularly Facebook) is associated with body image concerns among young women and men, and longitudinal studies suggest that this association may strengthen over time. Furthermore, appearance comparisons play a role in the relationship between social media and body image. Experimental studies, however, suggest that brief exposure to one’s own Facebook account does not negatively impact young women’s appearance concerns. Further longitudinal and experimental research is needed to determine which aspects of social media are most detrimental to people’s body image concerns. Research is also needed on more diverse samples as well as other social media platforms (e.g., Instagram).
    Full-text · Article · Sep 2015
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    • "Body image dissatisfaction (BID) refers to the negative subjective assessment of one's own body which results from the pressures that society places on an individual in terms of thinness and the deviation from the socio-culturally placed ideals for body shape (Glauert et al. 2009; Stice and Shaw 2003). It encompasses the difference between one's current body shape and their desired body shape (Neighbors and Sobal 2007). BID has been shown to increase the vulnerability to disordered eating patterns (Juarascio et al. 2011) as well as depressive symptoms (Ferreiro et al. 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: The present study aimed to examine the vulnerability to eating disorders (ED) among 949 Lebanese female young adults as well as its association with stress, anxiety, depression, body image dissatisfaction (BID), dysfunctional eating, body mass index, religious affiliation (Christian, Muslim, Druze or Other), religiosity and activity level. Results showed that anxiety had the greatest effect on increasing the predisposition to ED, followed by stress level, BID, depression and restrained eating. Affiliating as Christian was found to significantly decrease the vulnerability to developing an ED. Furthermore, the interaction of anxiety with intrinsic religiosity was found to have a protective role on reducing ED. The current study emphasized a buffering role of intrinsic religiosity against anxiety and ED vulnerability.
    Full-text · Article · Mar 2015 · Community Mental Health Journal
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    • "Body image dissatisfaction (BID) refers to the negative subjective assessment of one's own body which results from the pressures that society places on an individual in terms of thinness and the deviation from the socio-culturally placed ideals for body shape (Glauert et al. 2009; Stice and Shaw 2003). It encompasses the difference between one's current body shape and their desired body shape (Neighbors and Sobal 2007). BID has been shown to increase the vulnerability to disordered eating patterns (Juarascio et al. 2011) as well as depressive symptoms (Ferreiro et al. 2012). "

    Full-text · Article · Jan 2015 · Community Mental Health Journal
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