Article

The association between PTSD symptoms and salivary cortisol in youth: The role of time since the trauma

Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, Stanford University, Palo Alto, California, United States
Journal of Traumatic Stress (Impact Factor: 2.72). 10/2007; 20(5):903-7. DOI: 10.1002/jts.20251
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

This study examined the direction of association between symptoms of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and cortisol levels among youth with recent and distal traumas (N = 50; mean age = 10.7 years). Each had a clinical interview for PTSD symptoms, a cortisol assessment, and the time since the child's most recent trauma was assessed. Results indicated that the time since the most recent trauma moderated the association between cortisol and PTSD symptoms and comparisons indicated that there were significant differences in the size of the correlations across the recent and distal trauma groups. The results point to a potentially important role of the time since trauma in understanding the relationship between PTSD symptoms and cortisol.

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Available from: Carl F Weems, Feb 18, 2014
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    Full-text · Article · Apr 2014 · Hormones and Behavior
  • Source
    • "Both stress exposure and psychopathy are multi-faceted and we included multiple measures of each to understand their nature. We examined Abuse History, LSI lifetime stress rankings, and LSI chronic stress in the past year to index stressors with different severity and time-courses following Miller et al. (2007) or Weems and Carrion (2007). We considered combining the stress scores further but retained separate models given our conceptualization of the timecourse of stress effects and intercorrelations were modest (abuse with chronic stress, r = .30, "
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