Article

Condition‐specific sociodental impacts attributed to different anterior occlusal traits in Brazilian adolescents

Unidad de Investigación en Salud Pública Dental, Departamento de Odontología Social, Universidad Peruana Cayetano Heredia, Lima, Perú.
European Journal Of Oral Sciences (Impact Factor: 1.49). 01/2008; 115(6):473-8. DOI: 10.1111/j.1600-0722.2007.00486.x
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The aim of this study was to assess the association between different anterior occlusal traits and the presence of condition-specific sociodental impacts on the quality of life attributed to malocclusion. For that, 1,318 15-16-yr-old adolescents were randomly selected from children attending all secondary schools in Bauru, Brazil. Participants were first interviewed and then dentally examined. Condition-specific impacts (CSI) attributed to malocclusion were calculated using the Oral Impacts on Daily Performances (OIDP index). Nine anterior occlusal traits were evaluated: maxillary and mandibular overjet; openbite and overbite; centreline deviation; dental crowding and spacing; and maxillary and mandibular irregularity. Statistical associations were tested using binary logistic regression analysis. The prevalence of CSI attributed to malocclusions was 21.2%. Of the nine occlusal traits evaluated, maxillary and mandibular overjet, centreline deviation, dental spacing, openbite, and maxillary irregularity were, in that order, directly associated with the presence of CSI attributed to malocclusion. No interaction term was identified. This study, designed to overcome the limitations found in the existing literature, supports the idea that malocclusion can affect social interaction and psychosocial wellbeing. Different anterior occlusal traits affected the quality of life differently.

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Available from: Aubrey Sheiham, Feb 12, 2014
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