Effects of Cigarette Smoke in Mice Wound Healing is Strain Dependent

Article (PDF Available)inToxicologic Pathology 35(7):890-6 · February 2007with45 Reads
DOI: 10.1080/01926230701459986 · Source: PubMed
Abstract
It has been clinically and experimentally shown that cigarette smokers suffer from impaired wound healing, but the mechanisms that lead to the alterations are not well understood. The aim of this study was to investigate if the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on excisional cutaneous wound healing are different depending on the strain (Swiss, BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice) studied. Male mice were exposed to smoke of nine whole cigarettes per day, 3 times/day, daily, for 10 days. In the 11th day a full-thickness excisional wound was performed. Control group was sham-exposed and also had a full-thickness excisional wound. The cigarette smoke exposure protocol was performed until euthanasia. Animals were euthanatized 14 days after wounding. Wound contraction was evaluated 7 and 14 days after lesion. Sections were stained with hematoxylin-eosin, Sirius red or toluidine blue and immunostained for alpha-smooth muscle actin. Smoke exposed animals presented delay in wound contraction, in fibroblastic and inflammatory cells recruitment and in myofibroblastic differentiation; those alterations were strain dependent. Cigarette smoke exposure also affected mast cells recruitment and neoepidermis thickness. In conclusion, the present study demonstrated that the effects of cigarette smoke in mice cutaneous wound healing are related to mice strain studied.

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Available from: Luís Cristóvão Porto