Article

Multifunctional Nanoparticles for Photothermally Controlled Drug Delivery and Magnetic Resonance Imaging Enhancement

Department of Physics, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-742, Korea.
Small (Impact Factor: 8.37). 02/2008; 4(2):192-6. DOI: 10.1002/smll.200700807
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

The use of biodegradable polymer-metal multilayer half-shell nanoparticles (H-S NPs) for photothermally controlled drug delivery and magnetic resonance imaging enhancement, was analyzed. The drug is encapsulated within biocompatible and biodegradable polymer nanoparticles, where metal multilayers are deposited on these nanoparticles. The absorption spectra was measured of the nanoparticle using a UV-visible/NIR spectrometer for poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA)-Au H-S NPs. The optical and photothermal conversion properties of rhodamine-loaded PLGA-Au H-S NPs with PLGA nanoparticles were examined. Rhodamine release was monitored from PLGA nanoparticles using total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy (TIRFM). Results show that these nanoparticles can efficiently achieve their selective cell target.

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Available from: Jaemoon Yang, Apr 25, 2014
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    • "Near-infrared (NIR) resonant nanomaterials such as Au nanorods (GNRs) [7,12,13], multi-branched particles [14,15], nanoshells [16], and hollow-shells (HSs) [11,17] are attractive therapeutic agents because they can deliver drugs via non-invasive hyperthermia . NIR light in the range of 700e900 nm has been widely used to locally raise cell temperature, thereby optimizing the photothermal effect [18]. Triggered drug release by an external stimulus such as NIR irradiation could significantly advance cancer treatment by overcoming the indiscriminate drug distribution observed in conventional drug delivery. "

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    • "Near-infrared (NIR) resonant nanomaterials such as Au nanorods (GNRs) [7,12,13], multi-branched particles [14,15], nanoshells [16], and hollow-shells (HSs) [11,17] are attractive therapeutic agents because they can deliver drugs via non-invasive hyperthermia . NIR light in the range of 700e900 nm has been widely used to locally raise cell temperature, thereby optimizing the photothermal effect [18]. Triggered drug release by an external stimulus such as NIR irradiation could significantly advance cancer treatment by overcoming the indiscriminate drug distribution observed in conventional drug delivery. "
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    • "They are expected to increase the efficacy of therapeutic agents, while reducing unwanted side effects, such as toxicity. In addition, they could greatly curb the systemic side effect of anticancer drugs by regulating drug release kinetics [11,14,129,130,131,132,133]. "
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