Article

Childhood Obesity Predicts Adult Metabolic Syndrome: The Fels Longitudinal Study

Lifespan Health Research Center, Department of Community Health, Wright State University Boonshoft School of Medicine, Dayton, OH, USA.
The Journal of pediatrics (Impact Factor: 3.79). 03/2008; 152(2):191-200. DOI: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2007.07.055
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To determine the age of significant divergence in body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference in adults with and without the metabolic syndrome, and to provide age- and sex-specific childhood values that predict adult metabolic syndrome.
Part 1 of this study is a retrospective cohort study of 92 men and 59 women (mean age, 51 years) who had metabolic syndrome and 154 randomly selected adults matched for age and sex who did not have the syndrome. Part 2 is a study of predictive accuracy in a validation sample of 743 participants.
The first appearance of differences between adults with and without metabolic syndrome occurred at ages 8 and 13 for BMI and 6 and 13 for waist circumference in boys and girls, respectively. Odds ratios (ORs) for the metabolic syndrome at 30 years and older ranged from 1.4 to 1.9 across age groups in boys and from 0.8 to 2.8 across age groups in girls if BMI exceeded criterion values in childhood. The corresponding ORs for waist circumference ranged from 2.5 to 31.4 in boys and 1.7 to 2.5 in girls. These ORs increased with the number of examinations.
Children with BMI and waist circumference values exceeding the established criterion values are at increased risk for the adult metabolic syndrome.

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    • "Moreover, the long-term impact of childhood obesity has important consequences for morbidity and mortality as these children become adults (Speiser et al., 2005). Obesity at early stages of growth has been associated with the development of a number of metabolic alterations in adulthood such as obesity, (Guo et al., 2002) impaired glucose tolerance (Bhargava et al., 2004), hypertension and cardiovascular diseases (Virdis et al., 2009) and the metabolic syndrome (Sun et al., 2008). Factors affecting human growth could play an important role in the mechanisms leading to these metabolic disorders. "
    Dataset: HOMO2012

    Full-text · Dataset · Jan 2016
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    • "In recent years, attention has focused on improving the quality of dietary intake for elementary-aged school children in the United States (U.S.). Dietary quality and caloric density in relation to energy balance are major factors related to children being overweight and/or obese as are the compounding issues of an increased risk for several cardiometabolic diseases, even in young children [1] [2]. "
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    ABSTRACT: Soft drinks, fruit juice and milk are the most common caloric-beverages consumed by adolescents and teens. We report the ten-year trends in the percentage of daily calories consumed in the form of caloric-beverages from a broad sample of fifth-grade students in the United States. This is a major area of concern related to dietary quality and body weight amongst children. The study was conducted from 2001-2011 through the Healthy Hearts for Kids (HH4K) online instructional program. A total of 17,559 students from 1,048 schools in 49 US states participated. Results reveal there were no changes across the ten-year period in reported fruit juice and milk consumption in the past week. There was a significant downward trend in soft drink consumption in the ten-year period. Juice consumption was positively correlated with soft drink and milk consumption in the past week. Soft drink consumption was positively correlated with milk consumption. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks tomorrow was significantly related to soft drink consumption in the last week and to expected soft drink consumption a year from now. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks in a day one year from now was not related to reported soft drink consumption in the last week. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks tomorrow was not correlated with juice consumption in the past week or with milk consumption in the past week. In conclusion, soft drink consumption declined, but there were no changes in consumption of milk and fruit juice. Soft drinks did not appear to displace either milk or fruit juice. These participants appear to be aware that soft drinks are a less healthy choice.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015
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    • "In recent years, attention has focused on improving the quality of dietary intake for elementary-aged school children in the United States (U.S.). Dietary quality and caloric density in relation to energy balance are major factors related to children being overweight and/or obese as are the compounding issues of an increased risk for several cardiometabolic diseases, even in young children [1] [2]. "
    [Show abstract] [Hide abstract]
    ABSTRACT: Soft drinks, fruit juice and milk are the most common caloric-beverages consumed by adolescents and teens. We report the ten-year trends in the percentage of daily calories consumed in the form of caloric-beverages from a broad sample of fifth-grade students in the United States. This is a major area of concern related to dietary quality and body weight amongst children. The study was conducted from 2001-2011 through the Healthy Hearts for Kids (HH4K) online instructional program. A total of 17,559 students from 1,048 schools in 49 US states participated. Results reveal there were no changes across the ten-year period in reported fruit juice and milk consumption in the past week. There was a significant downward trend in soft drink consumption in the ten-year period. Juice consumption was positively correlated with soft drink and milk consumption in the past week. Soft drink consumption was positively correlated with milk consumption. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks tomorrow was significantly related to soft drink consumption in the last week and to expected soft drink consumption a year from now. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks in a day one year from now was not related to reported soft drink consumption in the last week. The intent to drink two or more soft drinks tomorrow was not correlated with juice consumption in the past week or with milk consumption in the past week. In conclusion, soft drink consumption declined, but there were no changes in consumption of milk and fruit juice. Soft drinks did not appear to displace either milk or fruit juice. These participants appear to be aware that soft drinks are a less healthy choice.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2015
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