Article

The Patient Health Questionnaire, Japanese version: validity according to the Mini-International Neuropaychiatric Interview-Plus

The Clinical Psychology Course, Graduate School of Niigata Seiryo University 1-5939, Suido Cho, Cyuoku, Niigata City, Niigata 951-8121, Japan.
Psychological Reports (Impact Factor: 0.53). 01/2008; 101(3 Pt 1):952-60. DOI: 10.2466/PR0.101.7.952-960
Source: PubMed

ABSTRACT

To validate the Japanese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire against the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus in Japan 131 patients in 4 primary care settings and 2 general hospital settings participated. These patients completed the Patient Health Questionnaire and returned it to their physician within 48 hr. Subsequently, the subjects underwent a diagnostic evaluation interview based on the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus by an interviewer blind to the results of the Patient Health Questionnaire screening. The Patient Health Questionnaire diagnosis was characterized using kappa values between 0.70 and 1.0 for Somatoform Disorder, Major Depressive Disorder, Panic Disorder, Bulimia Nervosa, Alcohol Abuse/Dependence, and Premenstrual Disorder. Sensitivities, specificities, and negative predictive values were very good (between 0.84 and 1.0) for the first 4 diagnoses but not Alcohol Abuse/Dependence or Premenstrual Disorder, as were the Positive predictive values (between 0.78 and 1.0). Findings show very good concordance of the Japanese version of the Patient Health Questionnaire with the Japanese version of the Mini-International Neuropsychiatric Interview-Plus.

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Available from: Kumiko Muramatsu, Aug 15, 2014
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    • "The Japanese version of the PHQ-9 was self-administered by the respondent in written form (Muramatsu et al., 2007). Major depressive episodes were diagnosed in two ways using the PHQ-9- diagnostic algorithm and a summary score (Inoue et al., 2012). "
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    ABSTRACT: We recently demonstrated in the structural equation modeling that four of five affective temperaments, as measured by the Temperament Evaluation of Memphis, Pisa, Paris, and San Diego auto-questionnaire version (TEMPS-A), are strong mediators between childhood abuse and depressive symptoms in the nonclinical general adult population. In this study, we hypothesized that affective temperaments, childhood abuse, and adult life events have moderator effects that interact with one another on depressive symptoms. The hierarchical multiple regression analysis was used to analyze this interaction model. The 286 participants from the nonclinical general adult population were studied using the following self-administered questionnaire surveys: the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), Life Experiences Survey (LES), TEMPS-A, and Child Abuse and Trauma Scale (CATS). The data were analyzed using hierarchical multiple regressions with interactions. Depressive temperament enhanced and hyperthymic temperament inhibited the depressogenic effects of childhood abuse, while irritable temperament enhanced and hyperthymic temperament inhibited the depressogenic effects of adult negative (stressful) life events. Adult positive life events had an inhibitory moderator effect on depressive symptoms that was increased by cyclothymic and anxious temperaments. Neglect, punishment, and total childhood abuse enhanced the effects of negative life events on depressive symptoms. As the subjects of this study were nonclinical, the findings should not be generalized to patients with mood disorders. In this cross-sectional study, there may be interdependence between the measured variables. This study, using the hierarchical multiple regression analysis with interaction, demonstrated the positive and negative interactions between any two of affective temperaments, childhood abuse, and adult life events, and the influence on depressive symptoms in the nonclinical general adult population. Important moderator roles for affective temperaments, childhood abuse, and adult life events on depressive symptoms were suggested. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.
    Full-text · Article · Aug 2015 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    • "The Japanese version of the PHQ-9 was self-completed by the patient in written form (Muramatsu et al., 2007). Major depressive episodes were diagnosed in two ways using the PHQ-9: diagnostic algorithm and a summary score. "
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    ABSTRACT: The influence of childhood abuse, adult stressful life events and temperaments on depressive symptoms in the non-clinical gen-eral adult population, The influence of childhood abuse, adult stressful life events and temperaments on depressive symptoms in the non-clinical general adult population, Journal of Affective Disorders, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jad.2014.02.004 This is a PDF file of an unedited manuscript that has been accepted for publication. As a service to our customers we are providing this early version of the manuscript. The manuscript will undergo copyediting, typesetting, and review of the resulting galley proof before it is published in its final citable form. Please note that during the production process errors may be discovered which could affect the content, and all legal disclaimers that apply to the journal pertain.
    Full-text · Article · Feb 2014 · Journal of Affective Disorders
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    • "In this study, we used the Japanese version of the PHQ-9. The Japanese version of the PHQ-9 also has excellent validity in primary care and in psychiatric settings [23] [24]. A major depressive episode is diagnosed in two ways using the PHQ- 9: it is diagnosed by a diagnostic algorithm and a summary score [19]. "
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    ABSTRACT: The aim of our study was to reveal the personality traits of individuals with major and other depressive episodes among the young adult population. Furthermore, character traits of individuals with ideas of suicide or self-harm were also investigated in this study. The subjects of this study were 1421 university students who completed the Patient Health Questionnaire (PHQ-9) and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI). The subjects were divided into three separate groups: the major depressive episode group (N=41), the other depressive episode group (N=97), and the non-depressive controls (N=1283). This separation was achieved using the PHQ-9 algorithm diagnosis. We compared the TCI scores using an analysis of variance. Moreover, the Cochran-Armitage trend test was used to determine the diagnosis, ideas of suicide or self-harm, and analysis of character profiles. The major depressive episode group had significantly higher HA (P<0.001), lower RD (P<0.001), lower SD (P<0.001), and lower C (P<0.001) scores than non-depressive controls. The other depressive episode group had significantly higher HA scores (P<0.001) and lower SD scores (P<0.001) than non-depressive controls. The Cochran-Armitage trend test revealed that the prevalence of depressive episodes decreased as the character profiles matured (χ(2)trend=57.2, P<0.0001). The same tendency was observed in individuals who had ideas of suicide or self-harm (χ(2)trend=49.3, P<0.0001). High HA and low SD scores were common personality traits among young adults with major depressive episodes. Furthermore, the immaturity of character profiles was clearly associated with depressive episodes and ideas of suicide or self-harm.
    Full-text · Article · Jul 2013 · Comprehensive psychiatry
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