Long-term results of salvage radiotherapy for the treatment of recurrent cervical carcinoma after prior surgery

ArticleinRadiotherapy and Oncology 89(2):197-204 · February 2008with9 Reads
Impact Factor: 4.36 · DOI: 10.1016/j.radonc.2008.01.004 · Source: PubMed

    Abstract

    Tumor recurrence after surgery for cervical carcinoma is associated with high fatality and morbidity, forming a major therapeutic challenge. This paper presents our experience with treatment of this patient group by salvage radiotherapy with curative intent.
    Thirty-five patients with a pelvic recurrence after hysterectomy received high-dose radiotherapy. A retrospective analysis of long-term outcome and prognostic factors was performed.
    After a median follow-up period of 12.1 years, actuarial 2-,5- and 10-year overall survival rates were 66%, 43% and 33%; disease-free survival rates were 62%, 45% and 41%, respectively. Pelvic control rates at 2-,5- and 10-years were 77%, 69% and 62%. Unfavorable prognostic factors on univariate analysis for survival were: recurrence extending to the pelvic wall versus central recurrence, early recurrence after surgery, external boost versus brachytherapy boost, low total dose and high age. Only a brachytherapy boost and a long interval between surgery and recurrence were significant on multivariate analysis. Severe complications (> or = grade 3) were seen in 6 patients (17%; actuarial after 5 years, 21%).
    Salvage radiotherapy for recurrent cervical carcinoma following surgery may result in 40-50% long-term disease-free survival and an acceptable risk of severe treatment complications, even in patient with recurrences extending to the pelvic wall.