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[Playing with identities, transforming shared realities: school theatre workshop for immigrant and refugee adolescents]

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Migration during adolescence represents a challenge for the youth who need to simultaneously work through the multiple losses associated with the migratory journey and adapt to a young adult status. The drama workshop program described here was designed to facilitate the adjustment of newly arrived immigrant teens. The aim of the program is to make it easier for adolescents to adjust to their new environment through creative group work around identity issues. The program also seeks to improve intergroup relations in multiethnic schools. The workshops are inspired both from playback theater and from Boal's form theater which emphasizes the collective transformation of the singular experience. The qualitative assessment of the program effects on the adolescents suggests that the workshops constitute a safe space of expression, in which the team and the ritual nature of the play hold the participants. The workshops facilitate the representation of the multiplicity of values in the adolescent world and invite them to reconsider the way in which they interact, with their environment, without splitting between "us" and "them," but rather creating solidarities around issues of social justice. The workshops also address the life transformation associated both with adolescence and migration and help the elaboration of the losses linked to the migratory journey and the construction of a hybrid identity.
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... Drama processes improved school performance [82] and increased emotional expression and awareness in students participating in school-based workshops for emotional regulation intervention [63]. Workshops using playback theatre, Boal's forum theatre, and other drama therapy tools provided a unique environment for migrant students to experience safety, pluralism, and an opportunity to act out shared experiences related to migration [83]. Image theatre was used as a research tool to identify themes related to acculturation stress experienced by Taiwanese performing arts students [41]. ...
... Not surprisingly, the content of this subcategory overlaps substantially with the content of the children and adolescents sub-category. Articles illustrated classroom and school interventions that address behavioral concerns [60], stigma [4], social integration [22], and support immigrant and refugee children and adolescents [63], [81], [82], [83]. One study in this sub-category also outlined in-school programming for students with Autism Spectrum Disorder resulting in a positive response from participants and the emergence of five main themes under the following categories: feelings, peers, social skills, structure, and families [31]. ...
... Additionally, research has presented drama therapeutic engagement with young women in foster or residential care [64], [84], [85], [87], participants who have witnessed domestic violence [20], [40], adolescents and children with emotional or behavioral challenges [57], [60], adolescent girls who were sexually abused [58], a child with selective mutism [72], bilingual Iranian students enrolled in a speech/languagefocused group [78], and a review of an outcome measure for children's generic impressions of mental health interventions [30]. A number of articles have focused on school-based, adolescent immigrant populations [63], [81], [82], [83] and further research reviewed drama therapy-based work with children using a dramaturgical role instrument in an outpatient clinic setting [33]. ...
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